Would you sell a game that isn't good?

Discussion in 'Indie Basics' started by Talisman, Oct 25, 2005.

  1. Sharpfish

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    Yeah, again my thoughts. Whether this is substantiated in fact is another matter. We realise there is little "brand loyalty" in shareware (if any) but personal pride is a valuable thing. Maybe sometimes to the detriment of monetry income but I like to take whatever small sleep I get at nights with a clear conscience ;)

    The problem with this thread is it is quite hypothetical because we all have different standards of what constitutes "a bad game" and we could maybe do with some screenshots and a gameplay overview of the game in question to really give accurate comments.

    It is true about first impressions for some though. There are certain companies who I find it hard to believe will ever make a game that will appeal to me based on their output to date. I am not a typical casual/indie games player though. Obviously a lot of players go through portals and may love your super new zuma style game and not even know or care that you also made "super paperclip simulator" in your early days or whatever. For a more direct sales-centric company I say impression counts and even though you may have some flops you should at least be proud of them, and give the customers the impression you have tried your hardest to please them.

    As usual two seperate issues crop up again - the "e-commerce/distribution" practice thing which is a GOOD thing, and the possible harm to company image which is of course a bad thing.
     
  2. Kaos

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    go for it! But I wouldnt go for the standard $19.99 price tag, if you dont think the game is very good, then $1.99 is a perfect price that way if your market doesnt like the game they can say "well at least it was only 2 bux!"

    If the game was sold for anything more than $9 this may turn future business away, and I would assume you are making games for profit, future profit is the most at stake and I do not think you would want to jeopardize that!

    But demo version should be around 20-30 min as the game is a cheaper price!
     
  3. gpetersz

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    Certainly not. If it is an average (not that baaaad), then maybe in the 6.99, 7.99 category... but not really.
     
  4. gosub

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    No, never!
     
  5. DavidRM

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    Until you get feedback from players, how do you know whether it's good or not?

    If you anticipate feelings of shame and remorse for selling something you think is crap, take a more gradual approach. Open up the game for free public testing and pay attention to the feedback you get. That way you'll find out if you're worried about the right things, or just being a Nervous Nelly. After that, you'll know more about whether you have something you can sell (and maybe have an idea for how much to charge), or whether you should move on to the next project.

    Self doubt is inevitable. Use it to your advantage to make the game even better.

    -David
     
  6. gpetersz

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    Naturally it is only my opinion, but without good "knowledge" of gaming (knowing the history, many-many succesful and failed titles, having a good taste etc) I think it is suiciede to develope games.

    The developer HAS TO grade (close estimate) his/her product. You have to know the industry (indie-industry, AAA-industry, freeware-industry) standards to be able to develope the best of you.
     
  7. MadSage

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    Personally, I want to avoid releasing a bad game. I believe image is important if you want to be successful. I think quality is important, and I want to release good, quality games from the start. I believe that releasing poor games gives your company a bad image.

    If all goes well, my first release should be a very enjoyable game to many people, with no bugs. Patches & updates are another thing I intend to avoid.

    Starting off by releasing poor games may work for some people, but I see it as a risk. Are there any successful people out there who believe they started out with a poor game? I'm curious.
     
  8. Greig Hamilton

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    There are bound to be people out there who developed and sold poor games before they made great games.

    What's the worst that can happen, if it's your first game and it bombs real bad and people hate it etc, then just restart with a new company name and website.

    Afterall if you don't release the game you will be in the same state as the person above who does release a bad game and then starts a new company. But you will have learnt a whole lot about creating and releasing a game.

    Greig
     
  9. Sirrus

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    Weren't we gunna work something out? ;)
     
  10. ManuelMarino

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    Well, my suggestion is to release only the best games you made... this is valuable in all fields. Consider music field, as example. If you want to be considered a very good composer and producer, you must never release a track that is not less than "awesome".

    By the way, I got TONS of tracks and piano studies and arrangements, scores and performances made for experience and study but I'll never release them.

    There is too much crap around, and if you are talented, better to show only your best things or you risk to be considered mediocre when you are not.
     
  11. nvision

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    I think starting out releasing a game that you, yourself, believe to be lacking is a step in the wrong direction. There are plenty of independent developers out there who are selling mediocre games. If you want to distinguish yourself form them, you have to put forth a quality product.

    I think if you use what you've done as a learning tool, you can improve upon it, until you can get to a point where you're happy with your game. This will not only have a positive impact on yourself, seeing that you can create a decent game that others will enjoy, but it will also start you out with a decent reputation for making good games. If you're happy with what you produce, and the public is too, it will be much better for generating future sales.
     

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