Would an American buy a game with 'Mono' in the title?

Discussion in 'Indie Basics' started by Talisman, Oct 29, 2010.

  1. Artinum

    Original Member

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    "Stereo Octopus" could be the sequel!
     
  2. speeder

    speeder New Member

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    There are one thing that bothers me more than "Mono".

    Is you calling US people "American".

    US is in America, US IS NOT America.


    But I automatically see "Mono" as in "Mono and Stereo"...
     
  3. Vino

    Vino New Member

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    Wow, I've never heard anybody be pedantic about THAT before. I don't think any American would object to being called an American. In fact a lot of them say "I'm an American!" with the implication that they have some kinds of rights that you don't. In fact remember that scene from Raiders of the Last Ark when Marion gets kidnapped? "You can't do this to me I'm an AMERICAN!"
     
  4. speeder

    speeder New Member

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    I am American.

    But I am not a US Citizen.


    All Americans that are not US Citizen get upset when US Citizens claim to be "American" or "North American" (that second maybe is worse, because implies that Canada is not to the north... it is like if Canada was "beyond" North somehow, or ignored, or the most insulting of all to the Canadians: That Canada is just some country subject to US for whatever reason)
     
  5. Jasmine

    Jasmine New Member

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    I also object to sentences with the word "European" in them, because England is in Europe, England IS NOT Europe. :p
     
  6. Vino

    Vino New Member

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    Oh so people will object if I use a geographically correct term to describe my location of origin?
     
  7. Applewood

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    BUddy, you need to either get your facts straight or learn better English Grammar if you're going to get upset about something you misunderstood.

    You are NOT an American. You are a Mexican?/Chilean?/Whatever

    If someone is addressing an invidual's citizenship, it's wrong to use their continent in the first instance. However if you insist, then an Argentinian would be a SOUTH AMERICAN whilst a Canadian, Mexican or US Citizen would be a NORTH AMERICAN. There is no continent called simply "America".

    So what we're left with is the fact that citizen of Canada is a Canadian. A citizen of the United States of America is an American and a citizen of Mexico is a Mexican.

    ----------------
    My home country is even worse for this. I'm English, but I'm often referred to as a Brit which is wrong.

    There are four countries involved over here: England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

    The group of England, Scotland and Wales is adminstratively referred to as "Great Britain", or GB for short. Add in Northern Ireland and you get "The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland", or UK for short. That is what's actually on my passport, despite the fact than I'm actually English and the UK isn't a country!

    So I am an Englishman, but you can call me a Briton for some reason. If I was N. Irish, you'd call me an Irishman in all cases (even though to the South there is a completely foreign in every legal way country called just "Ireland" whose people are also called Irishmen.) There isn't even a short word for "UK Citizen" like "ukian" but that's what has the most weight politically. And you think you have terminology problems! :)
     
    #27 Applewood, Nov 3, 2010
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2010
  8. bantamcitygames

    Administrator Original Member Indie Author Greenlit

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    Mexico is in the continent of North America not South America, but I agree that US citizens refer to themselves as Americans and not in a "We own this continent" sort of way.
     
  9. Jasmine

    Jasmine New Member

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    I think it goes back to discovery of the "Americas", and that America has always been a friendlier term than a bunch of letters like USA.

    Bundling the northern and southern continents under one umbrella term is rather like we do with Eurasia. :)
     
  10. Applewood

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    Oops, my bad. Edited
     
  11. andrew

    andrew New Member

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    Er, what would a person living in the USA call themselves, if not "American"? A "United Stateser"? "Uniter"? "USA Citizen"? (and if so, why shouldn't a Canadian be a "Canada Citizen")

    "America" in an ancient sense was everything west of Europe. It ended up being two continents, so they added "North" and "South". The precise definition of what was the boundary of the United States didn't come until much later.

    - andrew
     
  12. electronicStar

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    I use USAn sometimes.
     
  13. Artinum

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    I define myself as "Andrew". That seems to work okay.
    Flippin' nationalism... it makes no sense. Being born in a particular country is not an achievement.
     
  14. Vino

    Vino New Member

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    I think the logic behind the whole "nationalism" thing is that a bunch of people you're probably related to died so that your country could be the way it is, so you should be proud that it's that way.
     
  15. Jasmine

    Jasmine New Member

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    Your nation is the natural extension of your family.

    The people who make up your nation all work together as part of the same machine. These are the people who provide you with food, a house, fine clothing, electricity and clean water.

    Money can often disguise that underlying mutual need and mutual cooperation. Nationalism actively recognises it.
     
  16. papillon

    Indie Author

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    I use USian to refer to them/us occasionally. (Of course I also use American, it depends on the conversation and how accurate/clear I feel is important.)

    Tried shortening it to 'Merkin for a while until I discovered that's a strange slang term for something else. :)
     
  17. Applewood

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    Heh, I just learned something new today too, thanks.

    Who'da thought something like that would even need a name! :-D
     
  18. magaly

    magaly New Member

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    i am american and mono to me, in this sense, means one. though i still believe the title is oddly worded/phrased.
     
  19. Artinum

    Original Member

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    GW Bush used that term in all his speeches. At least, I *think* that's what he said.

    "My fellow Merkins..."
     
  20. bantamcitygames

    Administrator Original Member Indie Author Greenlit

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    Haha... thats the first thing that came to mind when it was mentioned above
     

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