Which version control software

Discussion in 'Indie Basics' started by Greig Hamilton, Sep 2, 2007.

  1. Greig Hamilton

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    I'm currently developing in Java (J2ME) and need some sort of version control software. I'm developing on a single laptop and don't always have access to the internet so need some sort of version control that will let me have both the client and server software on the same computer.

    Does anyone have any suggestions for a good free version control system that works with Windows (2000 home edition) and hopefully Eclipse?

    I've tried CVS but it's almost impossible to set up on Windows and get it to work with Eclipse. I managed to get it to kind of work in dos but not to plug into Eclipse.

    So any recommendations and/or websites with useful instructions would be great. :)
     
  2. Adrian Cummings

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    I work on my own so don't use version control unless working in a team (sometimes but rare these days) and then it was Source Safe mostly.

    Regards J2ME I also use J Builder as believe or not, I actually hate Eclipse and found it slow and cluncky for some odd reason!? but I know many that use it in mobile development.

    I have no idea if Source Safe works with either of those tho sorry as I used it with other IDE's on GBA etc. but it was very good indeed although there is prolly better version control software available these days anyway?
     
  3. Bad Sector

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    Subversion. Get the TortoiseSVN client which embeds itself in Exploder. For eclipse, Subclipse.

    The first is very easy to use, you won't have problems and it's fully GUI driven. The second just adds SVN support to the whole Team thing (right click on the project, Team submenu). There are tutorials on setting it up with screenshots.

    While you're at it, i recommend running a local webserver with Trac and set it up to communicate with your subversion repository. Beyond being able to track your progress (when it comes to svn commits), you'll have a nice wiki to put your notes and stuff and a ticket/bugtracking/task system to put tasks in. The latest version of Eclipse (3.3) comes with Mylyn in their repositories, which provides a task-oriented interface to Eclipse (just read their site on that stuff, it helps :)) and also "trac connector" which provides you with the ability to use Trac as a task repository, edit tickets from within Eclipse, etc.

    This (plus some other plugins for Eclipse and Trac and the fact that Trac and my repository are on a dedicated system) is my current development setup and it's superb :).
     
  4. ZeHa

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    I'm using SVN, that's basically a CVS-clone with improvements, and there's a very good client for Windows called TortoiseSVN. And in eclipse, you can use Subclipse instead.
     
  5. Desktop Gaming

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    TortoiseSVN here, too.
     
  6. Paul-Jan

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    Same here. Subversion and TortoiseSVN. I am slowly getting used to "merging" (luckily I only develop in a 2-developer team right now so there is not too much pain), as at the day job I use VSS and a strict check-out/check-in based sharing model.

    Oh, and unless Source Safe is something completely different than Microsoft Visual Sourcesafe, it definitely isn't free. And as a stand-alone product, it doesn't do remote access either. There are 3rd party solutions for that, though.
     
  7. Nikos Beck

    Nikos Beck New Member

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    TortoiseSVN. It's very easy to use.

    I have used Vault, it's a .NET solution, that is incredibly slow and clunky. I do not recommend it. It takes literally an hour to grab a project. I have no idea why. It uses a check-out, check-in system which is much more of a pain than an update-commit-merge system.
     
  8. Xiotex

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    SVN looked like a good system... however I am having to use it for real for the first time at a client site I am currently working in and there have been issues. One I noticed that because of the shell integration that not all tools picked up the fact that files had changed - they used their cached versions. I also had problems updating files that were comitted to the repository. Until I discovered that this was what was happening it was as if a bug I was working on just refused to disappear.
     
  9. Dan MacDonald

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    Don't ever mess with the files directly in the repository, svn wont work well that way. You have to go though the commit process to ensure all clients get updated properly.
     
  10. Pyabo

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    If it's only two of you, you can use the free version of Perforce. Very nice software, pretty easy to set up.
     
  11. ChrisP

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    You must be (a) cursed, or (b) doing something really wrong (please tell me you're not modifying the contents of the repository directly - as Dan says, that's really not a good idea); because I know many people (including myself) who use it regularly, and none of them have ever had any of those issues.

    The shell integration of TortoiseSVN does cause Windows Explorer to be a bit laggy sometimes, but it's so gosh darn convenient that it's worth it in my opinion. (If you disagree, you can of course use another client; the shell integration is the entire point of TortoiseSVN, after all, and it's not like there aren't other SVN clients out there.) Other than that I haven't had any problems with SVN.
     
  12. Gary Preston

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    I've been using it daily on several projects over the last few years and never had a problem.

    If you haven't done so already, I'd recommend reading through the Subversion Book, it's available free on-line.
     
  13. Greig Hamilton

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    Wow thanks for all the replies. It looks like SVN is a good way to go. I guess my next step is to try and get all the different programs working together to get it into Eclipse.

    Thanks again.
     
  14. zoombapup

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    Perforce is the games industry standard, but its pricy. However they do a 2 (or is it 3?) user license for free.

    SVN is the next best option and is what we're currently using (because there are more of us), I'd prefer to use Perforce though, as its shell integration is just top notch.

    When I'm working alone, I run a perforce server and client on different machines in my network and work from there (so I get backup and repository control whilst not requiring internet etc).

    Both will do you fine.
     
  15. Nikster

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    This has been in another thread of similar topic, but I don't think they do the free licence for perforce anymore, you now get a time limited trial key.
     
  16. Desktop Gaming

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    There's still a free, limited version. You can get an evaluation licence though which removes the user limitation for a fixed period.
     
  17. Bad Sector

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    If you use Subclipse, you don't really need TortoiseSVN that much (of course using it only helps) since it provides all the functionality (from within Eclipse) that an SVN client has to offer.
     
  18. princec

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    I've been a staunch user of CVS and Eclipse for years now. Had CVSNT working just fine too as a local server. I had some terrible trouble with SVN and Eclipse though - just Didn't Work Properly. This was about 18 months ago - has it got a lot better?

    Cas :)
     
  19. Bad Sector

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    I use Subclipse for my engine development and i had almost* no problems with it. I would recommend it.

    *=There was a case where i had to rename a folder and modify some files. Subclipse didn't liked the idea and screwed up for some reason. It took me a while to figure out that i had to do an "update" before commiting after doing such a thing, even if i'm the only one working there. The bad thing is that Subclipse said nothing related and everytime i tried to commit i was getting an out of date error and then the svn connection was closed and i had to restart Eclipse. When i looked for 'out of date' on google i found the solution but really the message didn't helped...
     
  20. Pyabo

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    $800 per user for 1-20 users to be exact. <gulp>
     

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