What skills make for a useful team member?

Discussion in 'Indie Basics' started by TheWillardofOz, Nov 29, 2015.

  1. TheWillardofOz

    TheWillardofOz New Member

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    Hi all! I am a new member to the site and looking for some help getting started in the game development community. I am a music composer and sound designer, but all of my experience to this point has been in film.

    My question is what skills or software should I familiarize myself with in order to be the most helpful member of a development team? Is there any coding or otherwise technical aspects of development that I should learn?

    Thanks for reading and I'm happy to be part of the community!
     
  2. Kouros Prime

    Kouros Prime New Member

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    Well you already have a good enough skill to use. Sound and music are crucial in almost all games. It's not uncommon for composers to be hired as-is with no other skills.

    However, it should be somewhat obvious. What things go into making a game? If you want to be as useful as possible, I would go so far as to say that you should learn virtually everything yourself. Even if you don't want to wait till you're a master in everything or whatever, even if you go into it with fewer skills than that. You should still find time to learn a bit of the other stuff IMO. Most of history's masters, focused on studying everything that had anything to do with their work. The more skills you slap on, the more irreplaceable you are.
     
  3. metateen

    Moderator Indie Author

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    Click here for the answer.
     

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