What kind of people buy indie games?

Discussion in 'Game Design' started by dogzer, Oct 22, 2005.

  1. dogzer

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    Hi, i'm kind of new here. To start out I was wondering if you guys would like to discuss what kind of people would i be making games for?
    I have this question: When you can save your money and buy the best of games for 60 dollars, why would you spend any amount on an indie game?

    But just because of that doesn't mean you are going to fail on selling small indie games, this only means you need to find things to take advantage, for example choosing TYPE of people you sell games to. People who don't find what they want for 60 bux on the market. What public do you think people like us should design and sell our products to?
     
  2. Nexic

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    Middle aged people with no time for big games. Most of us are selling to that market.
     
  3. dogzer

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    Thanks Nexic, that makes sense, since they have money and probably just want something to relieve the stress.

    What kind of middle aged people though? Is it working peope who need to relax? or people who want non-violent games that makes them use their brains? Or people who want to play side-scrolling shooters with fast paced music? I have no experience on selling videogames, so i'm interested on any opinions you might have.
     
  4. cliffski

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    Your entire premsie is completely and utterly wrong. The best of games are the best of games, who makes them or what the budget was is totally and utterly irrelevant. Is The latest Tom Clancy a better book than 'Pride and prejudice' because it had a bigger marketing budget?
    I recently went to amazon.com to buy a agme, browsing the available titles looking to spend money. Cost wasn't really an option.
    I gave up, went to sillysoft.net and played Lux. Its a better game than Age of Empires 3 in my opinion, so I bought it. I dont give a damn how the budgets or production values stack up, Lux is fun.

    My market is everyone, from age 12 to 80, from university proffessors to people stacking shelves. from people new to games, to veteran gamers. from computer programmers to people who hardly know how PCs work. Men, Women, Kids, Grandparents.
    Don't asume a certain type of person buys indie games. Retail thought only 13yr old boys bought games, and targeted their games to match. Then match 3 came along and spanked that assumption big time.
    Everyone buys indie games.
     
  5. dogzer

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    First of all, forgive if i'm not wise enough, that's why i'm asking for opinions here in the first place.

    Cliffski: What´s the public opinion of what the "best of games" are is actually another discussion. So rather not going to get into that.
    I hope you understand that by best of games, i ment those that gets millions of sells, and are made by known companies. Like it or not, those games are concidered "better" by many people. My bet here would be to make something that doesn't compete directly against that.

    I thought since you guys are way more experienced than me, you had some research about if there's any high peak on type of people who are inclined to buy small indie games.

    I'm going to take what you said into account, because taking a wider range of posible buyers may (or may not) get more people to buy the game.

    My concern:
    *MAYBE* by making games for both kids who wants certain games or old women who likes the oposite type of games, you might lose both customers. Isn't this worth researching?
     
  6. ggambett

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    It may have as much to do with being "better" as with the millions of dollars invested in marketing said games. You can't compare AAA retail games and indie games on number of sales without considering the development and marketing budgets.
     
  7. simonbowerbank

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    The marketing budget doesnt decide the quality of the game, the production budget does.
     
  8. Ricardo C

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    I thought talented developers and solid game design determined quality ;)
     
  9. simonbowerbank

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    Talented developers dont work for free
     
  10. Robert Cummings

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    So when the marketing budget is huge, where does that leave the remaining production buget?

    think "movie licenses".
     
  11. Ricardo C

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    Some work for themselves.

    Others don't work for big companies, and don't make as much as they should.

    Still others are right here at Indiegamer, producing quality titles with small budgets.
     
  12. Bmc

    Bmc New Member

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    definetly not in the average code monkey's pocket ;)
     
  13. simonbowerbank

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    But the point is, if they had thirty million dollars to spend their games would be much better.
     
  14. Ricardo C

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    The game would likely look and sound much better. The gameplay wouldn't necessarily benefit from having more money thrown at it.
     
  15. simonbowerbank

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    You have the financial security to spend a lot of time perfecting and experimenting with the gameplay.
     
  16. Ricardo C

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    You do, if you are actually spending your own money, but not if there's a publisher threatening to shut you down if the game doesn't go gold in time for Christmas. If you know of any self-publishing developers who can afford to play around with $30 million with no pressure to get the product out the door, let me know so I can go beg for a job :D
     
  17. Anthony Flack

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    I really don't feel this, although I don't quite intend it in the usual indie-affirming, "it's all about the gameplay!" way. Even though, in a way, it is.

    It's just that by this point in my life, I own or have played several thousand games, and most games seem pretty boring to me now. I have to go through quite a few mediocre ones to find one that I like (although as a designer, there's still plenty to take in along the way). However,when I do find one I like, I enjoy it hugely.

    A thirty million dollar game does not really stand a better chance of being one of those rare games that I really like. And if it's not one I really like, then it doesn't matter whether I think it's okay, or if I think it's terrible - either way, I don't play it.
     
  18. dogzer

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    Even though you may know about these small great games, worldwide they are unknown. And -correct me if i'm wrong- the average gamer doesn't research how good these small games are. They just go to gamespot and check the screenies. And to THEM these big games are better, even though you may know they not and are just boring marketing products.
     
  19. C.S.Brewer

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    lucky for all of us, these small games seem to be getting more broad press in the gaming rags, and major sites. Hopefuly the general public will know more about them as time goes on. When I've told people about what I'm doing I've been surprised to hear a few, non developers say Wow! I love indie games.

    They certainly would shine prettier with all that gold plating! I can't find a quote, but for holloween, this reminds me of an interview about the making of Army of Darkness vs Evil Dead, I think. They said that on Evil Dead with such a low budget they had to do creative things that ended up working fine, like using rope to make someone hover. But on Army of Darkness with a large budget they tended to think in more complicated expensive ways, like trying to make an anti-gravity device :) maybe we tend to do the same sorts of things, which don't necessarily end up with a better game in the end?
     
    #19 C.S.Brewer, Oct 25, 2005
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2005
  20. Leper

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    If you have 30 million dollars to make a game, you wouldn't make a game that anyone would think of as an "indie game" ..

    If you had a 30 million dollar budget.. You could hire like like 500 people to put 40 hour work weeks into one aspect of the game each. That's how the retail people do it.

    I remember watching "the making of Mortal Kombat: balhblah" (the one that came out for xbox, ps2, gc)

    I saw how one guy alone did NOTHING but make death sequences all day long 40 hours a week.

    ok now think about what you could do as THE PRODUICER.. The guy who calls the shots.

    You've got 30 million dollars and a dozen directors. The directors have a dozen programmers (or something)

    You tell the directors.. "make this like that.. make this like that"

    That would kick so much butt!! Anything you ever wanted to realize in a game you've made but didnt have the time or lost some motivation wouldnt matter. You would have every little "idea" .. nook and cranny to critique and have it carried out within a matter of days because of how many programmers and artists are working for you. 30 million dollar games have a lot of power. Of course, it all goes down to the development team and so on.

    If you're highly organized and a great leader and all that good stuff, you could make the best game ever. If you have a team of devoted programmers and artists that are all passionate about the game (ie: you treat them all well, etc) you can make the best game ever.

    That's just my humble opinion! :rolleyes:
     

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