What do you use for project planning / management?

Discussion in 'Game Development (Technical)' started by Adrian Lopez, May 5, 2010.

  1. Adrian Lopez

    Original Member

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    For a while now I've been using Agilefant for one of my projects and think the latest version (2.0, currently in beta) is pretty good. I don't really adhere to Agile methodology (I just pick and choose what I like), but I've started doing "sprints" for the various pending features and issues in my project and so far it seems to be working.

    So Agilefant is what I use and I heartily recommend it, but what kind of processes and software do you guys use to plan and manage your projects?
     
  2. Maupin

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    PSPad, the text editor. I just add ideas to a text file, and refer to that.

    Mockups are done in Photoshop.

    All files are in a single directory somewhere.
     
  3. MFS

    MFS New Member

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    We use (and have used for about 3 years) Unfuddle. An account comes with the ability to set up SVN repos and a light project management system, where you can create milestones, notes, tickets (tasks). We've used it for planning, production, and perhaps most conveniently, bug tracking with outside agencies.
     
  4. mindgamemedia

    mindgamemedia New Member

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    I signed up for a cheap shared hosting package with Fivebean about a year ago. I hadn't heard of Unfuddle until now, but I use Fivebean for the same features. They have proven to have great uptime and there tech support is very responsive (I have had an account for a year). They host a bug tracking system which I don't use so I just litter my code with //TODO: tags. The feature I love is that they include Subversion. I guess it would be comparable to Unfuddle except you can use them for web hosting too (although I currently use it solely for Subversion).
     
  5. DavidRM

    Indie Author

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    I do all my project management with The Journal. Which shouldn't shock anyone, me being the developer and all. :)

    For managing asset files, I use Windows Explorer and a dedicated folder.

    -David
     
  6. Michael Flad

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    Anyone here who's using the Atlassian tools?

    The $10 starter license (up to 10 users, no other limitations, i.e. no reduced functionality, limited number of issues/projects or anything like that) could be a pretty good solution for even middle sized indie developers.
     
  7. luggage

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    We use OnTime and let them host it. Great for collaborating with lots of people. Free for a single user.
     
  8. txmikester

    txmikester New Member

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    I just joined here and I was wondering if you guys had discovered Atlassian yet. I can wholeheartedly vouch that their tools are awesome, and the $10 deal is a steal.

    We've been using JIRA and Confluence (the much more than $10 versions) at my day job for a few years, and they have been fantastic. There are tons of plugins available and they are very customizable. We setup our whole support ticket system in JIRA, including plugins that automatically create support tickets from support emails and voicemails to our support line, and it was easy to do and works great.

    When they came out with the $10 versions of their products, I jumped on that for my personal use - $60 a year for all those tools is a great deal. I use all of them except Bamboo, because I really don't need continuous integration. If you don't want the hassle of setting up your own server, they do have a hosted solution that gives you all the tools and a SVN repository. I think it's like $25/month per seat. Kind of pricey, but I guess if you have a distributed development team and don't have your own dedicated server, it's probably a cheaper option than getting a connection with static ips, setting up and running your own server, etc.

    If you use the Atlassian tools, also check out the Gliffy plugin. It's a 3rd party plugin, but they are matching the $10 deal for small teams. It's a Visio-type drawing tool, nice for doing design diagrams, quick ui mockups, etc. They make it for Confluence (the wiki) and JIRA, although I don't really see the point of the JIRA one. But the Confluence version is very useful.
     
  9. flavio

    flavio New Member

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    We use Redmine; I think that it's simple and complete.
     
  10. txmikester

    txmikester New Member

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    I looked into Redmine awhile back - it's a nice package. It seems very well suited to open-source type projects, where you can get bug tracking, a wiki, and a forum all in one package.

    The Atlassian tools we use can do a lot more, but definitely require more setup and sometimes making them all work together can be a bit frustrating (although they are 10x better at that now than say 2 years ago).

    Anyway, thanks for mentioning Redmine - I had forgotten about it. I would say for simple project management and collaboration, it's a great choice. If you need a more powerful solution and don't mind the extra complexity getting them setup, then the $10 Atlassian tools are a good choice too.
     
  11. jpoag

    jpoag New Member

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    BFG uses Jira for internal testing. We got Jira reports from internal testing and Excel files from GameOps.
     
  12. Julio Gorge

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    We use Fogcreek's Fogbugz and Kiln internally, and Mantis during beta testing with most clients.

    To anybody still using SVN —and without the intention to hijack the thread—: it's about time you switch to Mercurial or Git :cool:
     
  13. flavio

    flavio New Member

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    We are on "small" projects, so Redmine fulfills our needs without gaps; however thank you for the hint, if our needs will increase I'll remember this advice!
     
  14. Mattias Gustavsson

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  15. brianhay

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    Trac + SVN
     
  16. Vino

    Vino New Member

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    My project is me and a contractor. The contractor doesn't need to know much so I keep my project plan in Google Documents and my to do list in my paper notebook. I have seven pages of items crossed out so far for this project.
     
  17. dewitters

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    same here!
     
  18. HairyTroll

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  19. barogio

    barogio New Member

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    We use FogBugz for management of tasks + bugs.

    For planning I use Hansoft 1 user trial occasionally, I'd recommend checking this out if you can afford.
     
  20. txmikester

    txmikester New Member

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    I bow to your greater geekiness. :D
     

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