What do people look for in a music "pack"?

Discussion in 'Indie Business' started by Robin Gerndt, Nov 17, 2017.

  1. Robin Gerndt

    Robin Gerndt New Member

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    Hello,
    I'm looking into selling music "packs" on the Unity Asset Store and Unreal Marketplace and other sites.

    How similar to each other should the pieces be in a pack?
    And is it more important that most of the instruments in all songs are coherent, or that the moods the songs create are coherent, or the genre of the music itself?
    I strongly believe that every pack needs variation to not get very boring, but how much variation?

    I have been looking at other people's work and what popular packs seem to look like.
    I'm getting mixed signals from them.
    I've also looked at games with music that have had very strong impacts on my feelings and memories of the "overall experience" of the games, and tried to analyze how they do it.

    For example: Trine and World of Goo.
    Trine's soundtrack is very coherent both in terms of the instruments in each song and the uplifting spirit throughout the whole thing. Some pieces are slower and softer and others are much faster and exciting, but nothing is "sad" or "scary", and the instruments are very orchestral.
    World of Goo has very varied music. Some instruments are recurring but for the most part the songs use very different instruments, genres and set different moods for different levels.
    But it still manages to have a concentrated impact on the "overall feeling" that the music has on the game.


    What are your thoughts?
    Have you sold any music packs, or bought any for one of your own game?
    What has made you pleased or disappointed with the content you got?

    Thanks for reading!
     
  2. TheTodd

    TheTodd New Member

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    I think music packs should contain a good set of music from the game. This can include audio tracks and sound effects depending on the game itself.
     
  3. Robin Gerndt

    Robin Gerndt New Member

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    Can you clarify? I think you might have misunderstood me :)
    I want to sell music that people can buy and put in the games that they are making.
     
  4. Scoper

    Indie Author

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    In my opinion, the different musical tracks in a game (and thus also in any pack that I would consider buying) should have a common genre and use many of the same instruments and/or sounds. A game will often need different moods, so there is no advantage to all tracks in a pack having the same mood.
    However, usually I prefer to cherry pick individual tracks rather than buy a whole pack. Unless I am in a hurry (for prototyping purposes, I need cheap low-quality, small file size music) or the value of a pack as a whole is very good.
     
  5. Robin Gerndt

    Robin Gerndt New Member

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    Thanks!
    People in some other places I've posted in have said the same, so it seems to make sense :)
     
  6. Cleaf

    Cleaf New Member

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    Hello there, think about different game levels, with different music in eachone but still not too different from the previous one. As Scoper stated, games usually need different moods so if you are making a big pack you can think about having soundtracks for a normal map, a bossfight, a mountain level, etc.

    Common genre and "themes" like fantasy, sci-fi, etc, is a key to selling music packs.
     
  7. Big Impact Sound

    Big Impact Sound New Member

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    Yes as Cleaf mentions, you need continuity (=> a sense of recognition of the musical material by the listener/gamer) combined with variation (==> so the music stays interesting).

    So you need to make sure you have a certain 'mood, style or theme' for the whole game (so the game gets its own 'musical identity'), but with enough variation for each game event (boss, running around, menus,...) and level.
     
    Cleaf likes this.

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