Trial/Full vs. Standard/Pro

Discussion in 'Indie Business' started by Kai Backman, Oct 26, 2005.

  1. Kai Backman

    Original Member Indie Author IGF Finalist

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    Trial/Full - Give out a small part of the game (like they handle out small bits in a grocery story) and save most of the stuff for the full version. Trial has roughly 1/20 of the material.

    Standard/Pro - Have a free standard version with a pro (gold) version containing extra material. Give away the steak but sell the sizzle. Standard contains about 1/2 or more of the material.

    So what are your thoughts? Pro's and Con's with each approach? What are your own experiences? :D
     
  2. ManuelFLara

    Indie Author

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    I think the Standard/Pro model only works if there are enough people interested in the benefits of the Pro version. I've seen this working on on-line games, where there are free accounts and then there's extra stuff available if you pay to become a "premium" member, like more powerful items, access to hidden areas, etc. This works great for on-line games because you have a lot more people to play with, and although most of them do not pay to play, those who do, are happier because there's a lot of people to interact with. And they really feel like "elite" members, since they have access to more stuff, and probably have an advantage position versus not premium users.

    On the other hand, I don't know if this would work on a single player game. The Pro features should be very, very cool.

    EDIT: Oh, I forgot to mention that those two models are often seen as time limited (trial/full) versus feature limited (standard/pro). So in this case, obviously s/p would only work if the game is content based, like an RPG, racing game, platformer, etc. You can let the player play as much as he/she wants, but just to a small part of the game (few levels/races/weapons/etc) or play as far as he/she's able during the time limitation.
     
    #2 ManuelFLara, Oct 26, 2005
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2005
  3. gpetersz

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    I'll take the Standart/Pro path. As it's been said:
    A fine game for free with 16 levels or so. 32 levels in the Pro with level editor, network play, and customisable music playlist (ogg player).
    A good well polished game as Standart and offering many extras in the Pro.
     
  4. ggambett

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    I don't know. Your game is a very special case among indie games and it's not even remotely casual, so I'm not sure about how does this apply... but "Trial" says "you don't have it all" much more clearly than "Standard", which means "this is probably all you need, but if you're extremely l33t and work for NASA, get the Pro version!". But as I said, I don't know, maybe a big fraction of your audience is extemely l33t and do work for NASA :)
     
  5. Kai Backman

    Original Member Indie Author IGF Finalist

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    Heh .. I tried to be as neutral as possible but Gabriel kind of guesses my aim. I've started tinkering with the idea of having a much more featured standard edition combined with the yearly subscription pro version. I have a hunch that the conversion rate might actually increase, and even if it stayed the same there would be more exposure in the long run. This is probably a strategy usable for niche products, but might not be applicable to more traditional portal games. Erik and the Drod team are doing something in this direction, and I suspect it does wonders for them. :)

    And .. You don't need to be extremely l33t and work for Nasa. You just need to feel you are extremely l33t and should work for Nasa. I sure love to feel that way .. ;)
     

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