The Christmas Screw

Discussion in 'Indie Related Chat' started by papillon, Dec 16, 2005.

  1. papillon

    Indie Author

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    I'd just like to take this opportunity to say a hearty f-you to my husband's employer, who decided that the week before Christmas was a great time to lay people off.

    This may turn out to be the end of game-making for me for a long time, depending. It's all a bit in the air at the moment. But it does royally suck.
     
  2. Savant

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    Geez, great timing. :-/ Sorry to hear about that.
     
  3. Desktop Gaming

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    Employers don't give a toss about us. That's why we want to be independents.
     
  4. cliffski

    Moderator Original Member

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    well said, After some of the places I've worked, seeing the stuff that goes on... I've vowed never to work for anyone else ever again.
    Hope things work out well for you, and very badly for the employer in question.

    Edit: hey, you made cute knight! That's one of only 3 shareware games I ever bought. Don't give up making games!
     
  5. papillon

    Indie Author

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    *grin* thanks, well, I'd never really stop for good, but if I end up working nights at a supermarket or something, that could kinda slow me down. :) unlike a lot of you I don't have the option of high-paying programming jobs. I just don't have the background to apply for anything more than bare-minimum office work.

    Well, unless Bioware finally gives in and takes me on as a writer.

    Suggestions for budget publishers who might take on my girly lil RPG so I can try to squeeze a little more money out of it welcome.
     
  6. princec

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    Cute Knight, is, like, mysteriously totally addictive...

    Cas :)
     
  7. nvision

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    Oy...my condolences. I know how harsh that can be.

    My brother got laid off the day before his company xmas party, last year. This year, I was given a nice promotion and a hefty raise by the developer/publisher I was working for...my wife and I decided to buy our first house and plan a wedding after hearing the good news. Only, what I wasn't told was that my raise and promotion were meaningless, as the company had been run into the ground, and they declared bankruptcy a month later. That left me with substantial financial burdens, and no immediate means to deal with 'em.

    Aren't employers great!? :mad: Goes to show, you can only really count on yourself, which is why the indie route is a good one...

    *btw* Are you, by any chance, the same Papillon from the old Pixellation boards? I thought I recognized your Charm School sprites...
     
  8. Savant

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    As harsh as some of these stories are, remember that you're working for someone. They aren't your friend. They're going to do what's in their interest over yours -every time-. That's not because they're assholes or whatever - it's business and human nature.

    Doesn't mean that it sucks less, but nobody should really be surprised by this sort of thing. Assume that your employer is your friend and you're setting yourself up for future heartache.
     
  9. Indiepath.T

    Original Member Indie Author

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    Coupla years back an ex-employer called everyone into the office for a xmas send off and told us that we might not have jobs to come back to.. Thanks mate! Odd thing is that a few of us, including me, didn't bother going back! Oh and he went bust a few months later :D
     
  10. Jack Norton

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    A remake of Princess Maker was truly a great idea indeed. I loved the original, played it so many times. Hadn't time to check yours out but the screenshots looks familiar ;)

    As for getting into Bioware as writer, you mean using the Aurora Toolset. I tried too for a long time (1 year) before giving up because I started shareware. That tool rules anyway and Edmonton seems a nice place to live.

    Good luck any route you'll take!
     
  11. papillon

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    Oh, P's job isn't doing what's in their interest over his. They're just *idiots*. I could tell stories... :) He's the entire IT support department at the moment, too. He's hoping to talk them into just cutting him to part-time, so their computers continue to work and he has time to pursue other interests. Of course, that would actually make sense, which means they may not go for it. Who knows? It hasn't all settled yet. All the meetings and stuff to work out precisely what goes on are next week.

    But yeah, employers in general can be rough. One point that keeps getting driven home from reading places like customers_suck is exactly how miserable capitalism loves to make people in the name of efficiency. Keep everyone on strict performance targets (after all, retail/callcentre staff are easily replaceable) and unsurprisingly they absolutely LOATHE the public, who might ask a stupid question and throw their resolution time off average, or step past the store's people-counter mechanism and then not buy anything, screwing up their visitor/sale conversion ratio...

    Keeping people on targets makes money for the business, but it makes everybody hate everybody else. Very sad.

    I miss my old academic job. :)
     
  12. Phil Steinmeyer

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    If a company goes bust, that can't really be helped. It's an unfortunate side effect of capitalism.

    BUT, the management of a company that is 'in danger' certainly has some idea of that, and even if they don't care to make a company-wide announcement that they're teetering on the edge, they should certainly NOT do the opposite (give people big raises/promotions and the implication of security), and should go further and at least keep their ears open for employees contemplating big moves (i.e. buying a house), and quietly discourage that employee from doing so at that time. To do any less is selfish and bad faith by the management.
     
  13. Fabio

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    That's exactly what I was going to say. Thanks for saving me the typing. But no, wait, I actually typed more because of it. :D
     
  14. Savant

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    Phil

    Sure, I can agree with that. If you know you're going bust it's only right to quietly pull the potential home buyer aside and whisper a warning. That's nothing to do with business - that's being human.
     
  15. Nexic

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    Well my dad got laid off last chirstmas, and hes now self employed doing the same job, less hours and earning twice as much. Self employment is the answer!
     
  16. rioka

    rioka New Member

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    With that said - maybe you can rope your husband to the world of indie game development. (Well, it's worth a shot... :) )
     
  17. GBGames

    Indie Author

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    My condolences to you and your husband. I also just read that Midway let go of 100 people.

    I still don't understand why the stock market usually rewards companies when they fire so many people at a time. "Hey, this company just fired 10,000 employees! Let's buy their stock since they obviously know what they're doing."

    If you two don't already read it, http://ripples.typepad.com/ is an interesting blog by David St. Lawrence. I would also suggest getting his book "Danger Quicksand: Have a Nice Day". Basically, what people are saying here is correct: self-employment is the only safe employment. It's a goal most people don't have, but they should.
     
  18. Hamumu

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    This speaks to the whole notion of "stability". It used to be a fancy indie catchphrase that you're actually much more stable working for yourself than for someone else. And in fact, it is true! The money rolls in whether you do anything or not (once you have a game released). It'll gradually rise or fall, but always gradually. You always have an idea of the future. It'll never just drop dead out of the blue, which is what can happen working for someone else.
     
  19. Pyabo

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    Ha! It's even worse under communism... why be more efficient than your neighbor if you get paid the same? :)
     
  20. Ricardo C

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    Because if you don't it's off to the gulag with you :D
     

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