The absolute newbie...

Discussion in 'Game Development (Technical)' started by and990, Apr 18, 2016.

  1. and990

    and990 New Member

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    Hi everyone,

    As the title says I'm new in this thing. I thought about making a simple card game, sort of turn-based, in Unity.
    Before I say anything else please remember that besides programming I don't know too much about all of this.
    So I want to do the software part in Eclipse, and then take it, maybe rewrite it into Eclipse and add the visual part. And I also want to use a database, so I can keep all the cards with their respective values and abilities, etc.
    I think that most of you who know even a little about how a game should be made will be very mad at me but I really want to learn how to make a game, even one like this. So want I wanted to ask you is this. Can someone explain or maybe give me a playlist of videos or some tutorial or anything about the basics, database, the programming itself and all of that so that I can have a point to start from? I will appreciate every piece of advice of how to pull this of. I realize that this will probably take months but I have a lot of free time and time is not a problem.

    I hope I haven't upset a lot of people with my post and sorry if I posted in the wrong section.
     
  2. Scoper

    Indie Author

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    Interesting. I love Eclipse and I love Unity, but I have never tried them together. Is there any particular reason why you want this unusual combination?
    Unity was built to integrate with MonoDevelop or Visual Studio. But if you manage to get Unity and Eclipse to play well together, please share your experiences.

    There are many very good tutorials for Unity. Both in writing and in video. I can recommend the official ones on the Unity website: https://unity3d.com/learn/tutorials if you have not already found them.
     
  3. and990

    and990 New Member

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    Hi. Thank you for your reply. I actually found them some time ago and the only reason I wanted to make some part of the game in Eclipse and then copy it into Unity is because I didn't used Unity too much. Besides this I'm still very curious how to make a database for my game, or however it is called. A simple link to youtube would be great. I just need some basic information to have a start point, that's all I want...
     
  4. Scoper

    Indie Author

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    I don't have enough experience with databases in Unity to give you more information that you have probably already found yourself.
    But if you just need to store small amounts of data (less than a megabyte), you can alternatively use the PlayerPrefs class in stead of a database.
    And if the player is not able to change the card values and abilities, you can also simply store your data in a text or xml file and import it as a TextAsset.
     
    SaltyDog likes this.
  5. SaltyDog

    SaltyDog New Member

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    Eclipse is literally the worst IDE ever. It's buggy, its plugins are buggy, it has the most obtuse project configurations. Yeah it has great dependency management plugins and whatnot for Java, but that's not what you'd be using it for.

    I've used it plenty, and there are almost always better options.

    In Unity you use Visual Studio, and don't let anyone else tell you different.

    Scoper is correct about databases. Unless you're dealing with a huge amount of stuff, you're probably better off using xml or json.
     
    Scoper likes this.

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