Starting Indie

Discussion in 'Indie Basics' started by Blue Falkon, Apr 14, 2006.

  1. LilGames

    LilGames New Member

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    Umm, when linking to a BLOG it's always wise to mention where to find the article in particular (such as by post date). Sure right now the "Article" in question (June 7th, 2006 entry) is only the 2nd one down, but a year from now it will probably have moved off into archives.

    (Had to mention it -- there are other threads here from 2005 I've read, clicked links hoping to find particular information, only to find a very recent blog and the info I was looking for is nowhere in sight).
     
  2. zoombapup

    Moderator Original Member

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    Ah, my caveat there.. read it *all* :)
     
  3. T4RG4

    Original Member

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    I'd suggest getting a job and working in the professional side of the industry for at least a couple of years! How will you recruit talented people if you have ZERO experience and have just left school? I will assume you cannot offer people financial security.

    You should want to understand how the business works, you'll learn so much by working for a while that I cannot stress how important it is. Having friends and family tell you your posters and ideas are great is nice, but how will you react when someone tells you it stinks?

    Of course, if you think you know best you have to accept what someone like myself says, think it through and if you're still 100% sure of yourself... go ahead and do it. If you fail you'll know you tried and thats more than most people do.

    BUT... You are so far behind your indie competition already. It's not an idea that makes a game, its execution (in a number of areas) and by your own admission you have no real world experience in this. Forget those crappy game design books, often written by fools, dancing through the fairy world of theory ;) All imho of course.
     
  4. vjvj

    Indie Author

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    That's exactly what I did, and I don't regret it in the least. It's amazing how much you learn with an experienced team.

    The only thing I regret is not diving into indie development sooner...
     
  5. T4RG4

    Original Member

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    Well... That regret will spur you on to work harder and faster no doubt ;)

    There really are too many people who think they can leave school and create a games business these days. I think its because Indie gaming has made the dream of developer ownership viable again. Anyone who has spent a while in the so called 'pro' area of game dev will have a much better understanding of what it takes to create a game that can sell.
     
  6. vjvj

    Indie Author

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    Yep, that and the fact that universities tend to focus on projects instead of products, without ever giving students a clear distinction between the two.

    The end result is a steady stream of students armed with cool graphics demos thinking "Making a game will be easy! All we need to do is add art and levels! And balancing will be a piece of cake; I know a lot about games because I play a lot of them!". It's all a recipe for a huge disaster.

    Despite all the anti-EA sentiment in our community, I frequently encourage new college grads to find an EA-like company for experience. You learn a lot about production and certain sides of the business aspect... If after a few years you decide you want more, you can always find a smaller/indie shop to bring your talents to.
     
  7. adjustedrace

    adjustedrace New Member

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    I go to high school too and am interested in indie game development too and have been reading this posts. From my experience. Game Development looks easy from the outside. Yes. But on the inside it's a battle. I'm trying to create a simple pong game in VB.Net 2.0 and let me tell you. It is hard. Basically it's creating AI, physics, graphics etc... thats the hard part.Well may be the whole. It takes a lot of man hours to put that one simple game together.

    I think you won't be able to put a team together unless you are a decent code yourself Blue Falkon. I think being young is not the time to start thinking about creating the business. Just learn how to "actully" make games. Stop playing CS and start learning.

    In Martial Arts there are a lot of kids that want to be "Black Belts" and learn cool Karate moves. Most of them get bored and tired of training and want to learn how to do that 1 hit K.O. move. That takes YEARS of learning skills to do.
    They think they can do it. But when they try. They fail....




    Miserably...




    You've got to stop dreaming and start living and taking action by learning the skills to create games.

    Here is another experince:
    I once got this book Managed DirectX Graphics and Games programming. It was bloody hard to understand. Just getting simple textured 3d rectangles to render is hard.

    Once I was reading this forum and a guy said:
    I find that quote so true and while your young is the best time to learn "every tool". Well maybe you don't have to learn all the ins and outs but there is still a lot to learn. :)
    Thats what I think anyway and yes guys I'm quitting my personal game dev dreaming addiction and learning.
     
  8. JPickford

    Original Member

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    Great post. I wish I was as wise 20+ years ago.
     
  9. HairyTroll

    Original Member

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