sick of EULAs

Discussion in 'Indie Related Chat' started by bvanevery, Aug 23, 2007.

  1. Tom Cain

    Indie Author

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    I thought the main point of a software EULA was the warranty disclaimer, not the copyright.
     
  2. Infinite Element

    Infinite Element New Member

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    The EULA (End User License Agreement) Is to tell the user what they can/can't do with the software. So naturally, it will have copyright stuff to show that it is copyrighted to someone, so you can't copy it.
     
  3. MedievalElks

    MedievalElks New Member

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    You may not stop the thieves from stealing your work, but perhaps you can stop others from downloading it from these sites by shaming them with a watermark or splash that blares loudly that the software is unregistered and illegal.
     
  4. Spore Man

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    YES! YES! I absolutely HATE this and believe we should all start a campaign to put a stop to this nonsense!!!!!!! When I want to play "Oblivion" I look for "Oblivion" ! I Check for "Oblivion" or I look in "Games/". I cannot and will never remember that I need to look for "Bethesda Softworks"!!!!!!!! AARRRGh

    Or if I'm looking to play Cubis Gold, How am I to remember it's in "/Real/Games/" ?? And BIG FISH, stop installing extra crap with my demos!

    :mad:

    PS: Bnavery: I heard the Big Bang is coming "when it's done".
     
  5. Infinite Element

    Infinite Element New Member

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    Well, if you're like me and display the company logo for a few seconds at startup, it would be easy to remember, wouldn't it?
     
  6. bvanevery

    bvanevery New Member

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    Not necessarily. Your company name could be quite boring. Also, I have to be able to find the bloody game before I can see any intro screens.
     
  7. tagged

    Original Member

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    I agree, I hate having to recall the company name first then the game. Its only handy for those that have 100+ games installed, so that their start menu isn't 5 columns long. Personally I ignore the start menu, I have my software/games as toolbars on the taskbar. Quick access :)

    But this reminds me of a room mate I once had, he used to install games to \games\publisher\game series\game name*.. Took a dozen clicks to get to a folder :p

    *example: games\blizzard\starcraft\starcraft 1\ (yes, even before starcraft 2 was announced :confused: )
     
  8. bvanevery

    bvanevery New Member

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    Techies are prone to ritualistic and obsessive impulses. It takes a lot of industry experience to partially beat it out of them.
     
  9. Infinite Element

    Infinite Element New Member

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    If it bugs you that much, when you're installing it, you can always just change the folder name, unless the installer doesn't allow it.
     
  10. bvanevery

    bvanevery New Member

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    Dude, having to do the extra typing bugs me also. Especially since I won't consistently remember to do it over the long haul, which means when I go to look up something later, I have no idea where it is.
     
  11. lordmetroid

    lordmetroid New Member

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    The question is not how to stop people but rather why you don't think it is okay or rather realize and face reality of fact. That you aren't made of money! The only thing that an EULA can do is to allow you to file lawsuits to the left and right which in the end will make you the looser of time and other resources.

    While I too want business, I understand one thing, people consider what they bought their own! Whatever abstract limitation you declare for what you are selling. The empirical nature of things is that if I buy a book I will recognize any use of the book as legitimate because I bought the darn book. I didn't buy a copy of your ideas to use in a very limited way of your whim. I buy it on my terms and in the end of the day you want to make money so you accept their terms the moment you bring any context for sale. So go with the shit and realize that customers don't agree with whatever silly abstract use you are selling when it comes to context based property and in the end they have the whole package in their possesion and will do whatever they darn want with it.

    Plagarization means you are becomming recognized and acknowledged, it means your ideas are spreading. Why wouldn't you want that? It is nothing but an advantage on the cut-throat competing market.
     
    #31 lordmetroid, Aug 25, 2007
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2007
  12. tagged

    Original Member

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    I personally install every game to a Games folder, which is on a separate physical HD than the OS install. It's a little tick of my own that I cant install games to a "program files" directory :p
     
  13. ZeHa

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    Yeah, I always install my games into C:\Spiele\ ("Spiele" being the german word for "Games"). Then, I always hope that the installer lets me choose my startmenu folder by myself, and I simply enter ..\Spiele\Gamename (since I have some important folders right in the starmenu root, above "Programs").

    I also use ..\Graphics\ and ..\Music\ and such, depending on the applications, but recently I installed Corel Draw and it said "there are unallowed characters in the folder name". What?! So I have to move it manually as soon as it's finished. But anyway, that's the only way for me to keep my startmenu clean. And I always find what I'm looking for :)

    And yeah... having the "company folder" in between everything really SUCKS... I simply don't understand what use they're thinking from that...
     
  14. cliffski

    Moderator Original Member

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    oh dear. you don't buy jack shit on YOUR terms. you buy it on the sellers terms. If you don't like the terms, don't buy it.

    How many of your games are currently on sale? people often hold these views till they release games and try to earn a living from it.
     
  15. Adrian Cummings

    Indie Author

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    Personally I've given up on this particular thread now, but for one last go while I sup my mug of tea...

    I'm not preaching to the masses here rather from vast wealth of past experience to the newbies at least - oh yes and I've earned my right by length of time in this business to state that too god damn it! :) Have a EULA if you want and it makes you happy :) but it is a waste of time if you don't have the clout and bollox to fight for the terms expressed in it when it comes to the day your game is ripped to buggery by x in the far east.

    I am a small business and true indie (always will be) I don't agree with ripping and piracy in general *it is a bad thing* but I don't put a EULA in because it is fecking EULA'sless!, but YOU all can put in as many as YOU like, as nobody (including me) will read it anyway when the play your game or they rip it off.

    And... IF, just IF it is any good then 'they' will rip it off else they won't... and your EULA is even more useless to you than even you thought in the first place :)
     
    #35 Adrian Cummings, Aug 26, 2007
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2007
  16. lordmetroid

    lordmetroid New Member

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    Well this is usually the case but when it comes to artificial abstractions the common person doesn't care to care about your terms because he is buying what he is seeing. You can imagine anything but the reality doesn't change.

    And in the end, they are your customers. Don't fare a legal war against your precious customers!
     
    #36 lordmetroid, Aug 26, 2007
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2007
  17. Qitsune

    Qitsune New Member

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    Customers who hack and redistribute your stuff and screw around your terms are not precious.
     
  18. Jack Norton

    Indie Author

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    I invite you to make a new revolutionary game idea, and get cloned in 2 months losing all profits. Then we can speak again if you want :D
     
  19. lordmetroid

    lordmetroid New Member

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    I don't really want to get all too confrontational with this topic. But yes that would suck, don't see how I could stop such a thing to happen though.
     
    #39 lordmetroid, Aug 26, 2007
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2007
  20. Tom Cain

    Indie Author

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    If you distribute software the main reason you want to include the EULA isn't the copyright, it's the warranty disclaimer. Copyright is automatically in place but warranty disclaimer isn't. That's the part that basically says the software could very well erase the hard drive and melt the computer into slag, so you've been warned and by running it you're agreeing to take that risk and it won't be our fault. Most companies also include copyright notices because the EULA is already there, so why not include that text also.
     

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