RegNow Network vs. Trymedia Network

Discussion in 'Indie Business' started by dypaul, Feb 13, 2005.

  1. dypaul

    Original Member

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2005
    Messages:
    38
    Likes Received:
    0
    The RegNow affiliate network program claims they have over 3,000 affiliates to choose from. The Trymedia affiliate network program also claims they have over 3,000 affiliates to choose from. So which one is better? Can anyone here share their success (or failure) stories about how effective these networks may be? Thanks.

    Also, I noticed a crucial difference between the two programs when reading their respective terms & conditions. In RegNow's case, you have the control and can choose who will be your affiliate and at what commission rate. In Trymedia's case, however, they have complete freedom to sell your game to any affiliate on their network at the predetermined rate of 60%. In essence, you would be giving them the right of non-exclusive agent/distributor role. I think that is terrible, especially if your game proves popular, for the following reason:

    Out of that 60%, Trymedia pockets 20% for ecommerce. Now suppose your game proves very popular and you have affiliates lining up to sign up your game at 25-30% commission. Trymedia has 40% to work with, and can turn around and offer those same affiliates 35%, pocketing 5% for itself. That means you'd be competing against yourself!! Don't give control of your game to Trymedia, especially when your game is popular. Or draft a separate, customized contract with them, the way Popcap does.
     
  2. James C. Smith

    Moderator Original Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2004
    Messages:
    1,768
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have put my games into the RegNow Network, the Trymedia Network, and Softwrap. None of them seemed to do much sales at all. In my experience, the smallest “portalsâ€￾ seem to do better than the biggest affiliate programs of payment processors/DRM providers.
     

Share This Page

  • About Indie Gamer

    When the original Dexterity Forums closed in 2004, Indie Gamer was born and a diverse community has grown out of a passion for creating great games. Here you will find over 10 years of in-depth discussion on game design, the business of game development, and marketing/sales. Indie Gamer also provides a friendly place to meet up with other Developers, Artists, Composers and Writers.
  • Buy us a beer!

    Indie Gamer is delicately held together by a single poor bastard who thankfully gets help from various community volunteers. If you frequent this site or have found value in something you've learned here, help keep the site running by donating a few dollars (for beer of course)!

    Sure, I'll Buy You a Beer