One Price for Everyone Broken System - Gabe Newell

Discussion in 'Indie Business' started by HarryBalls, May 18, 2011.

  1. HarryBalls

    HarryBalls New Member

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  2. Dan MacDonald

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    More interesting to me was his philosophy on how creative teams should organize and operate. Good read.
     
  3. loki

    loki Guest

    as far as my opinion, the linux distros are just going bad because its not really open source they are making, i for example wanted to work (for free since open source) for ubuntu, fedora, and mint.
    they all ignored me, in fedora no one even sayd hello to help me around.
    so naturally someone like me will get angry and make his own distro and crush them on every level.
    thats the problem with open source - egoism and different ideas.
    besides ubuntu just loves osx.

    sorry for derailing, it would be a bright future if open source succeeds and i and everyone else would be glad to take a part if we have jobs to survive meanwhile.
    but anyway im not a hardcore open source man, the people who make the distros are
     
  4. Vino

    Vino New Member

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    This is classic Gabe. He's thinking about some crazy system that would be nice in a perfect world but probably won't work. They might try it out for a while but then end up taking it down later.

    Dan's right, the entire rest of the article was more interesting.
     
  5. Bad Sector

    Original Member

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    That wasn't just a derail, that was totally off topic.

    Wrong thread?
     
  6. HL706

    HL706 New Member

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    The idea that people decide their own workload and delegate tasks between themselves was quite interesting. It also explains why Half Life 2 took so damn long to produce! :D
     
  7. loki

    loki Guest

    o god cant believe i confused him with a linux guy. i wish he would finally do half life 3, but it seems my children will play it some day (made by fans instead of valve) atleast their steam service is the best
     
  8. Vino

    Vino New Member

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    No I think they weren't using this system for HL2. That took a long time because they just plain underestimated the amount of work. I think they've been doing this system about starting with Orange Box.
     
  9. Bad Sector

    Original Member

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    @Vino:
    How did you got that impression? He clearly mentioned that they worked like this for years and produced all these games. He also mentioned that for this to work, it needs "autonomous" people and gave as an example the way an artist-turned-programmer-turned-level-designer-etc made both the skeletal animation for the original Half-Life (and later HL2) and worked in every aspect (code, art, level design) on one of the most memorable parts of the game. Which, btw, never contained any titles in the credits like their later games (i recently played all Half-Life games from 1 to Episode 2 and no game had titles in the credits) which is in line with what he said in the interview.

    So, yeah, i doubt it is something recent. Besides, you don't change the way a company works that easily.
     
  10. jcottier

    jcottier New Member

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    There is probably a big proportion of truth in this story, but this is obviously a "marketing" story.

    JC
     
  11. Vino

    Vino New Member

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    @Bad Sector:

    Oh perhaps I am confusing the autonomy system with the episodic system that they adopted around then.

    Still though I wouldn't blame the autonomy for HL2. They simply bit off more than they could chew and anybody can do that. They were the first to do many things with that engine.
     
  12. Bad Sector

    Original Member

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    Ah i didn't blame the autonomy, actually i fully agree with that kind of system -- assuming the team consists of the right people of course :) (but they seem to go to great lengths to ensure that).

    But i agree on the "bit off more than they could chew". If you read the Half-Life 2: Raising the bar book, you'll see that they had so many things planned that didn't made to the game (some made it in the episodes). While the HL2 is huge as it is, they shrinked it a lot from the initial plans and it's abrupt ending shows that.

    As for the episodes, well, they seem to try new things now and then. In-game minishops where people can not only buy but also sell game items seem to be their latest experiment.
     
  13. HL706

    HL706 New Member

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    Tbf, my tongue was firmly 'in-cheek' when I posted that.
     
  14. Vino

    Vino New Member

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    Oh yeah I love the autonomy thing. I've been on teams where there was one guy (me) having to find work for everybody else to do all of the time. I'd much prefer an autonomy system where people can find their own work. Managers aren't necessary if everybody has a little bit of manager inside their head. But then, you can't do that with just any team, you have to hire people who can manage themselves. Teams I've worked on in the past probably wouldn't work this way, there's a lot of people who don't work like that and need someone telling them what to do. Autonomous teams need to be built from the ground up.
     

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