New C4 Engine demo available

Discussion in 'Feedback Requests' started by Eric Lengyel, Jul 25, 2005.

  1. Eric Lengyel

    Original Member Greenlit

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    A new and much larger demo of the C4 Engine is now available at the following location:

    http://www.terathon.com/c4engine/

    The C4 Engine is a cross-platform comprehensive game engine with state-of-the-art graphics capabilities, and it can be licensed for the indie-friendly price of $100 per user. It runs on Windows and MacOS X, and all licensees get code updates for life.
     
  2. Sybixsus

    Original Member

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    I am currently looking for an engine/language/tool for a future project, and along with Cobra and GameBench, this looks like it might be suitable. I was wondering if you have any plans to make C4 accessible from other languages. As a DLL, perhaps? I've never been a big fan of C, and I would prefer to use BlitzMax, PureBasic, or even Delphi.
     
  3. Indiepath

    Indiepath New Member

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    Screenshots looked real nice. Couple of suggestion though:

    - What DirectX does the windows version use? Or does it use OpenGL?
    - Can you code games for linux as well?
    - I think it would be a good idea to tell what kind of games you can create with this... RTS? FPS (so it seems..)
     
  4. Captain Nemo

    Original Member

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    The engine is looking good, but from a post on the forum I saw that it doesn't support blended animations. Unfortunately this is a show stopper for me.
     
  5. stan

    Original Member Indie Author

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    From the C4 engine architecture graph, I deduce that the engine uses OpenGL and not Direct3D.

    Does the licence include the right to port the engine to other platforms (and distribute the result, of course)?
     
  6. Eric Lengyel

    Original Member Greenlit

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    Yes, the engine uses OpenGL for graphics for speed and cross-platform compatibility. On Windows, it uses the DirectSound and DirectInput components of DirectX.

    Licensees are free to port the engine to Linux if they want to, but they are not allowed to redistribute their ported code. Now, if someone does do the port and wants to donate their Linux-specific code to the project, we would be interested in integrating it into the engine and giving credit (and possibility freebies) where it's due.

    The engine is primarily targeted at FPS-type games, but is general enough to be used for just about anything. We've had a couple of people make small racing games and space sims, for example. The nice thing is that if a licensee needs a particular new feature for their project, they can ask us for it, and it will likely appear in a future build -- the engine is under active continuing development.

    A major upgrade to the animation system is scheduled for next month (because we're getting some new character art in). It will definitely have full blending capabilities.
     
  7. ggambett

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    Looks really nice; unfortunately I have a GeForce4 MX 4000 so I can't test it. Maybe when I get a new video card... I'd port it to Linux, just to be able to develop in it comfortably.

    It would be nice if the engine downgraded gracefully when running in a GF4MX... it doesn't. Apparently it doesn't even use multitexturing (ie no shadow maps) which is well supported in ancient hardware.
     
  8. Eric Lengyel

    Original Member Greenlit

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    The GeForce 4MX is much more limited than most people realize. With only 2 texture units, 2 general register combiners, no hardware vertex programs, no shadow mapping, and no support for 3D textures, supporting that particular card would be extremely painful. It's unfortunate that there are so many of those out there, and that Nvidia's marketing department chose that misleading name for the chip.

    Even though the engine doesn't use light mapping, it uses multitexturing for bump mapping, specular reflections, emission, light source attenuation, depth-based shadow maps, ambient radiosity, and a bunch of other stuff. On register combiner hardware, it also has to use normalization cube maps, which eat up one texture unit per pass, so any decent shader would require at least 3-4 passes. This adds up to a lot of fill as well as the extra cost of processing vertices for each pass without the benefit of hardware vertex programs.
     
    #8 Eric Lengyel, Jul 27, 2005
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2005
  9. ggambett

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    OK, you convinced me, I'll have to upgrade my ancient video card :)
     

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