My first little ASCII game.

Discussion in 'Indie Basics' started by Cubies, Jun 28, 2006.

  1. Cubies

    Original Member

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    Hello, Indie Developers.

    I'm thinking about making a little ASCII game for fun. I did C# programming a few years back, this was in the year 1998 when I was using Borland C#. They don't sell this software anymore unfortunately so I was wondering if anyone out there knew where I could get my hands on a copy or something a little better? I'm not looking for an IDE that will let me create 3D rotating cubes that can merge into flashing triangles and disappear into soft particle pixels. I just want to make a simple ASCII game and I don't mind paying for the software.

    I would like it if the IDE could handle Object Orientated programming, thanks to lemmy101 for writing his article 'C++ tutorial for codophobes' unfortunately it's still unfinnished though you have taught me what OO was. (I thought it was like saying 'Ooooh')

    Saying thank you in advance from Cubies.
     
  2. MibUK

    Original Member

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    Uh I dont get your question,

    A good compiler and IDE for people who've had a little programming experience and no budget is the Visual C# 2005 Express Edition from Microsoft.

    Borland didn't support C# until C# builder in 2003.
    And unless you are using the Ascii art library (aalib.sourceforeg.net I think) 3D stuff in an Ascii game isn;t terribly simple.

    Anyway, my recommendation is Microsoft Express products, ether the C# or C++ products.

    Best of luck
     
  3. Cubies

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    I'm thinking you should read carefully before hitting the 'reply' button. I said and I quote "I'm NOT looking for an IDE that will let me create 3D rotating cubes that can merge into flashing triangles and disappear into soft particle pixels." I made comment because people will suggest huge Microsoft software with bells and whistles that costs £2,000 and comes on 3 DVDs. When all I want is a little free download for creating simple DOS ASCII games. I once made a picture of an evil bunny using Notepad, I didn't need to import any ASCII tools.

    PS: Yes you could be right, I think it was Borland C not Borland C#, sorry about that.
     
  4. MibUK

    Original Member

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    Dammit.

    Amazing what missing a single word can make to a message.

    ER, Dev-C++ is a good free ide, MS gui like though, might be a bit much.

    Might well be worth looking at DJGPP, it doesn't create Windows apps, only MSDOS, but they will run under windows if I remember correctly. There is an IDE that comes with it, with a weird name. Looks exactly like the old Turbo Pascal 7 or Turbo C gui, blue background, ASCII frames.
    Ah reminiscing, I'll hunt down some URLS, hang on...

    DJGPP can be found at DJ Delories website at http://www.delorie.com/djgpp/
    Ah, IDE is called RHIDE, and is availabel form the same place.

    Hope that helps, I think I remember Turbo C being made free a while back, Borland used to do that to their products that were like 2 version out of date. you might be able to find the older dos compiler from there for free.

    Of course cygwin will let you do what you want, but comes with no ide, but you could try www.vim.org or emacs on windows, which being a Vim-Apostle, I think is a blasphemy but I imagine theres a version at www.gnu.org/emacs that might link to a windows version.

    Also worth looking at might be the Allegro library. Handles Dos modes and obviously Mode-X or VGA/SVGA stuff. Not really for Ascii nethack style display.

    For Ascii displays, if your running linux. GNUCurses is a good way to go, as it simplifies the dispaly (nethack, angband etc all use it generally, called ncurses in some places I think). I don't think curses has veer been ported to windows.

    Sorry I misunderstood the first question, hope that this list will help you find something you like, or at least some good starting places.

    Possibly worth checking out aalib if your interested in ASCII-ART, theres a linux port of Doom that is done all in ascii art, and runs on a console! It's not a tool, but a programming library.
     
  5. svero

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    Well since microsoft offers a free version of visual studio express online for download, Id suggest you just get that. It's industry standard and pretty easy to work with and won't cost you anything. You can get it here...

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/express/visualc/

    - S
     
  6. Cubies

    Original Member

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    Oh, thank you for all this information. Yes it's all coming back to me now, we used a program called Borland Turbo C, I've also got qualifications in Pascal. Haha, was as lame now as it was back then. Good first language but wasn't very good if you're wanting to write video games using OpenGL or DirectX SDK.

    I'm going to see if I can get my hands on Borland Turbo C again, but thanks for all the information.
     
  7. RohoMech

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    I would also check out:
    processing.org/

    Its in Java, but in terms of just getting a quick prototype up, or having something to play around with, its really neat. Also, you can post it online instead of needing to setup an installer etc.

    Anyways, good luck with your forary into OO and Game Programming.
     

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