Marketing your game. Is it worth it?

Discussion in 'Indie Business' started by alch_roy, Jan 9, 2016.

  1. alch_roy

    alch_roy New Member

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    I just launched my kickstarter campaign, and truth be told is not going so well... ( Follow it here: http://kck.st/1n9mBdq)

    I spent around 1 month marketing the pre-launch and I will spend another month trying to reach my goal, all without spending any money for marketing.

    My thoughts are, is it really worth it? Spending 2 months, or whatever amount of your time, trying something new instead of developing your game? Should I just leave it to the experts and go back to development or should I just live this experience as well?

    I am really interested to hear your thoughts on this one.
     
  2. metateen

    Moderator Indie Author

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    Kickstarter works wonderfully for the big name projects or those who get named by bigger internet people/groups. (example, Shenmue 3)

    Though let's back out for a moment and just reflect on this again, use your time wisely. Make another game while your marketing that one,that way people still know you're still making something else on the side so you have a motivation face. So if one plummets, you have another thing going to keep you bound up.

    Try something new? no problem though it gets boring kinda fast, as game making is my love and inspiration.
     
  3. Rockykev

    Rockykev New Member

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    Can you clarify - how are you marketing?
    Marketing is a broad spectrum of terms.

    Are you integrating into a community, and showcasing your game?
    Are you building relationships with people of influence who can help promote your game?
    Are you connecting with those in your scene having conversations, doing market research to see what worked and what didn't?

    What is the 'marketing' that you're doing?

    You can literally spending a entire month creating a trailer video and then blindly sending cold emails to journalists - then call it a dud.
     
  4. metateen

    Moderator Indie Author

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    Is this directed to me or the Op?
     
  5. Michael Flad

    Indie Author

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    If you do it to promote the game alone it's probably worth whatever marketing you do - if you do it to get the little money you aimed for, it's not.
     
  6. Rockykev

    Rockykev New Member

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    This was directed at the op - based on this comment.
    "I spent around 1 month marketing the pre-launch and I will spend another month trying to reach my goal"

    What was the ROI on the various strategies? If they're all failing - then there's clarity.
     
    metateen likes this.
  7. Gmicek

    Original Member

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    Looking at the Kickstarter I see a few issues that likely held the campaign back.
    • The mobile category is tough. I don't know what sort of traffic that category gets, but a lot of the regular crowdfunding fans that I know don't even go into the mobile games section.
    • The campaign is just listed under "michael". I always feel strange about giving money to people that won't tell me their last name or doesn't give a brief bio on the campaign page. I understand you linked your Facebook account, so your full name is available there, but don't count on people going that deep.
    • You video features lots of gameplay, but your campaign page doesn't contain any screenshots or in-game animated gifs.
    • Some people have an issue with backing campaigns by people that haven't backed campaigns themselves, or only appear to have backed some when their campaign was active, or ready to launch. I don't have an issue with this, but I can see where people are coming from.
    • Your reward tiers aren't very compelling, and they even call out the fact that the game has in-app purchases; which is a huge turn-off for some.
    • The cover image doesn't grab ones attention. Users scrolling through new campaigns may not be drawn to it.
    • In the beginning you say "we are developing..." but in the campaign you only mention yourself. Do you have multiple people working on it, or just yourself?
     
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  8. DMATH

    DMATH New Member

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    Definitely worth it!

    For example

    If your trying to break into an over saturated market (like iOS games) than marketing is key and becomes more expensive than actually making your game for that market in the first place. Spreading by word of mouth becomes key if you don't want to spend money on getting ad spots on the internet.

    You should have an separate fund just for marketing and pr

    Shitty games earn lots of money because they spend more on advertising
     
    Rockykev likes this.
  9. Frozen Cube

    Frozen Cube New Member

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    Rockykev likes this.
  10. Rekusi

    Indie Author

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    Marketing is extremely important because word of mouth isn't always enough. How will people play the game if they don't know of its existence? Giving people what they didnt know they wanted is one of the basics of marketing. Make awareness.
     
    Frozen Cube, DMATH and Rockykev like this.
  11. CayleRose

    CayleRose New Member

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    In these cases, its best to partner with a publishing company, such as Nexon.
     

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