How much should i be paid for this?

Discussion in 'Indie Business' started by tobscomputersam, Dec 16, 2014.

  1. tobscomputersam

    tobscomputersam New Member

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    I recently got a job offer (programming) to work on some stuff for a month. this is what I am supposed to work on:

    counting laps, finishing the levels, connecting levels and unlocking parts upon level completion. Installing the part on desired cars, or remove them.

    thank you for your feedback,

    -Sam
     
  2. CCHAudio

    CCHAudio New Member

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    A lot of that will depend on the company's resources. Also how much time do you estimate it will take? Is this a 10-hour a day job for a whole month or will you be done in a week?
     
  3. mythro

    mythro New Member

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    I recommend setting a set pay per line of code if you are not sure. Instead on an hourly pay. I would choose $1 to $5 per line just don't over charge lol. try to determine how many lines it will take and calculate from there.

    - - - Updated - - -

    you know we are in a team you could just ask me lol
     
  4. tobscomputersam

    tobscomputersam New Member

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    I didn't think that would be a good question to ask you since it was for another project

    And thank you Audio
     
  5. Dewfreak83

    Dewfreak83 New Member

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    Please don't do this.

    That being said, based on the information you provided folks can only provide a generic answer and not an actual estimation. You will indeed have to estimate though. And you will be incorrect. Only experience and more knowledge about the problem can better improve an estimation (and why agile development is so popular).

    A couple of rules to help you estimate:
    1. Take each high level problem, and break it down into smaller problems.
    2. Add a rough time estimation to each broke down problem.
    3. Repeat steps 1-2 until the largest problem is no more than 4 hours (or half a day)
    4. There will be work you didn't account for, so add 20% to the total estimation
    5. You are far too optimistic in your original estimations, multiply the total hours by 3 (yes a magic number)

    I don't do contracting so this next part I'm just winging, but I would perhaps:
    • Go online and lookup what an average developer gets paid for your years of experience in your region.
    • Multiply that number against your total hours you estimated
    • Add additional 10-20% to this estimate for contractor overhead
    • Provide a high-level version of this to the person you are contracting to and you may be able to alleviate risk and cut costs. Or make them feel more secure that you know what you are doing (or perhaps not doing...).

    Finally, you should keep a rough track of how long a particular problem did take (at a high level), to help with your future estimations. Estimating is a skill you will constantly be improving through your lifetime as a programmer.
     
  6. george

    Original Member

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    How much should i be paid for this

    It should ask you what settings you want on start up, is there not a windowed mode box that you have to uncheck?
     

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