Have you made backups?

Discussion in 'Indie Basics' started by Game Producer, Apr 20, 2011.

  1. Game Producer

    Moderator Original Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2006
    Messages:
    1,418
    Likes Received:
    2
    Leadwerks boards just got loss of data... and now reverted back to 6 months old state.

    Without taking any stance on their issue... this just reminded me:

    Have you taken backups of your game code/website/material/stuff recently? What if your hard drive would choose to explode today?
     
  2. Desktop Gaming

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2005
    Messages:
    2,296
    Likes Received:
    12
    I have my working copy on my internal hard drive, my subversion repository on an 8GB USB flash drive, plus daily backups of the repository on a second external hard drive. Then the [important] contents of my external hard drive backed up to DVD periodically. I should probably get a blu ray drive.
     
  3. Jack Norton

    Indie Author

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2004
    Messages:
    5,130
    Likes Received:
    0
    I backup daily on two external HDs and two online services (idrive,dropbox). I think that should be enough :D
     
  4. richtaur

    Indie Author

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2009
    Messages:
    262
    Likes Received:
    0
    I backup all my work locally and in the cloud: GitHub for source code and Dropbox for other files.
     
  5. Indinera

    Moderator Indie Author

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2008
    Messages:
    636
    Likes Received:
    0
    I use USB sticks ant ouside computers personally.
     
  6. frozax

    Indie Author

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2005
    Messages:
    95
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm also using Dropbox to save my work online and on another computer using synchronization (usually once every 2 or 3 days).
     
  7. Mike Boeh

    Administrator Original Member

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2004
    Messages:
    949
    Likes Received:
    0
    Speaking of Dropbox. Has anyone here ever considered compiling your projects from a dropbox instead of using svn?
     
  8. Dan MacDonald

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2004
    Messages:
    1,424
    Likes Received:
    0
    I've thought of managing my assets directory that way, I would really miss the versioning features of SVN on code files though. Being able to diff revisions etc.
     
  9. Indiepath

    Indiepath New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2004
    Messages:
    999
    Likes Received:
    0
    My databases are all replicated to slaves and all get backed up once a day and rotated every three days. My SVN server is backed up once a day with working copies on at least two machines. All desktops/laptops are Ghosted (norton Ghost) to external USB drives at least twice a week. All backups are tested for restore viability. I too learnt the hard way many years ago!!
     
  10. Adrian Lopez

    Original Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2004
    Messages:
    489
    Likes Received:
    0
    I find SVN's diff and atomic commit features (as well as its approach to logging changes and comparing changes between arbitrary revisions) way too useful to migrate from that to a Dropbox-only solution. What I do is periodically back up my SVN repositories to a ZIP file and upload that to a Dropbox folder.
     
  11. Grey Alien

    Indie Author

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2005
    Messages:
    2,797
    Likes Received:
    0
    Got a 1TB USB 3 external drive recently and backing up so fast now it's really neat. Also yes I backup my blog comments etc.
     
  12. Nexic

    Indie Author

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2004
    Messages:
    2,437
    Likes Received:
    0
    Server DB is backed up off-site incrementally a couple of times per day. Work on local machine is backed up automatically using MozyPro. Also use versioning software on remote server for code.
     
  13. Desktop Gaming

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2005
    Messages:
    2,296
    Likes Received:
    12
    All you folks who do 'offsite' backups - what internet connections do you have? I have "up to 8mb" and I generally get at least 6mb but upstream is a mere 48k. Do the likes of dropbox perform some magical compression to speed up backups and the like? Or any other solutions for folk like me with crap internet? (I'm UK, btw).
     
  14. Escotia

    Indie Author

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2004
    Messages:
    82
    Likes Received:
    0
    This is a really great topic and I'm interested to hear everyone's thoughts because we pondered over this for some time. Online storage seemed really expensive, and though it recently seems to have got a lot cheaper, as DG points out, you're always at the mercy of someone else.

    In the end we have a Thecus N5200 with 5 1TB drives running in RAID5, which contains our source control, data and backups. Each user's machine has a work drive which is backed up to the N5200 daily using Acronis True Image.

    At midnight, our N5200 in the office uses rsync to mirror to an identical N5200 stored offsite, just in case we're robbed or there's a fire.
     
  15. Jack Norton

    Indie Author

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2004
    Messages:
    5,130
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have worse upstream: 32kb but doesn't matter, the program runs in background so you just tell which files to backup and it does it automatically when I'm away from PC (iDrive). For Dropbox is similar, I use it with Syncback.
     
  16. Paul Reeves

    Paul Reeves New Member

    Joined:
    May 22, 2007
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    You can create an svn repository in your dropbox folder. This works from the point of view of back up if you are working on your own but if you have multiple people checking then it will not end well. Everyone is checking into a copied repository which is then synced to the main one on dropbox servers, chance are at some point changes might be lost.
     
  17. Gary Preston

    Original Member

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2005
    Messages:
    239
    Likes Received:
    0
    If you're wanting off-site (or local for that matter) backups on the cheap, have a look at CrashPlan. Whilst their "cloud" part of the service doesn't allow storage of business related data, the app can be used for business purposes to backup to local USB drives, other machines on your account and machines your friends/family/co-workers own at remote sites. Plus you get some online cloud storage for your personal files such as irreplaceable photos.

    Dead simple to install and configure.
     
    #17 Gary Preston, Apr 21, 2011
    Last edited: May 12, 2011
  18. meds

    meds New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2008
    Messages:
    344
    Likes Received:
    0
    Yeah no backups here, I figure if I fuck up it's all the more motivation to build from zero again.
     
  19. Adrian Lopez

    Original Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2004
    Messages:
    489
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dropbox does a binary diff of modified files prior to uploading so it only has to upload those parts that have changed. The first time is therefore slower (it has to send all the data -- don't know if it's compressed), but after that it does it relatively quickly for most changes.
     
  20. ManuelMarino

    Original Member

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2005
    Messages:
    316
    Likes Received:
    4
    I make a backup of my data about 1 time every month, and I copy it on 2 external HDs, and also on a laptop hard drive. Then I have databases backups every week. Saying that, I had one of my 4 HDs in my main workstation, fault. Working but making strange noises. So I think I'll completely upgrade the workstation with a new tower, with a single HD, this time, with 2 tera.
     

Share This Page

  • About Indie Gamer

    When the original Dexterity Forums closed in 2004, Indie Gamer was born and a diverse community has grown out of a passion for creating great games. Here you will find over 10 years of in-depth discussion on game design, the business of game development, and marketing/sales. Indie Gamer also provides a friendly place to meet up with other Developers, Artists, Composers and Writers.
  • Buy us a beer!

    Indie Gamer is delicately held together by a single poor bastard who thankfully gets help from various community volunteers. If you frequent this site or have found value in something you've learned here, help keep the site running by donating a few dollars (for beer of course)!

    Sure, I'll Buy You a Beer