Greetings

Discussion in 'Indie Basics' started by Fenrir Fenris, May 21, 2009.

  1. Fenrir Fenris

    Fenrir Fenris New Member

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    Hey, i'm Fenrir.

    I'm 17 and im totally new to this WHOLE thing, seriously. I have no idea if i'd be any good at this, but I think i'd like to see if this it the kind of career I would like, since I have been unsure for... well forever.

    I know what your probably thinking, “aww god, it's some newby kid.”

    This is very true, I have next to no idea what I'm doing. So, any advice on somone who is very intrested? I have some questions, like how exactly you sell indie games and how you make money etc, but more important is advice!

    =]
     
  2. Cevo70

    Cevo70 New Member

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    Are you pursuing a skill/craft that applies to gaming? Are you in school, or maybe a self taught programmer/artist?
     
  3. Jim B

    Jim B New Member

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    A good place to start is Sloperama. Since you are just starting out and looking to make a career as a game developer, I would start with this article.
     
  4. Maupin

    Original Member

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    Start making games.

    All the information you need is online and there's nothing stopping you. Don't think, "If I just had X or Y I could make a game." Everything you need is available if you have an internet connection.

    Since you're new to game development you'll probably have to learn programming. Learn as you go.

    Can you make big, fun games? Or games you'd play yourself in your free time? No, you're new, so you have to start small with boring games like Pong or Space Invaders clones. Or even simpler. That's okay, so did everyone else here. Even small simple games will be a real challenge for a beginning developer.

    It's hard to finish a game. 95% or more of people who want to be game developers never finish a single game. You have to be driven. You have to realize that the game you want to make is two or three or more games ahead of where you're at now.

    My advice? Start with Flash games. Learn ActionScript 3 and use some of the free tools online to compile a Flash game. There are tons of amazingly stupid, simple Flash games online. It's actually possible to make money through sponsorship/ads with small Flash games.

    Start small, work your way up.
     
  5. TimS

    Original Member

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    First of all, nice name. :)

    Keep your nose in those Mythology texts... that type of knowledge will serve you well in your game design pursuits forever.

    It's true what everyone here has (and will) say... start small. But beyond that, was there some specific bit that you're looking for advice on? You seem to suggest that you want to know about selling and about making money, but does that mean that your path of actually developing the games is already clear to you?

    You also mention that you have no idea if you'd be any good at it... well can you program? Are you willing to learn? Or are you not so much interested in code and just looking to be a 'game designer'? Do you specifically want to run your own company (as a small 'indie' operation) or are you more interested in working on something like Bioshock?

    You also mention you'd like to "see if this it the kind of career I would like". Does this imply you're looking for some general input about whether or not we're having fun out here in 'this world'?

    -Tim
     
  6. baldong

    baldong New Member

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    I think the best advice for u are from friends or teachers around u, who is already indie or in the game company :D
     
  7. mooktown

    Original Member

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    If you're not sure if creating games is for you, give it a try in your spare time as a hobby. But ultimately, go see a careers advisor.
     
  8. Desktop Gaming

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    This is sound advice. However, something I would add to this, is that early games should be seen as a learning process, and although you might well be proud of what you've done, if you ask others for feedback then they might not be quite as impressed with your game as you are, and what they say may reflect that. So don't take it personally when/if you get criticism. Learn from it, and make the next one better.

    These simple games are important as they will teach you techniques that you will be able to adapt into bigger projects later.

    I'd recommend starting with a simple two-player Pong game. When you've done that, add in a one player mode with basic artificial intelligence. After that, maybe add difficulty levels, and so on.
     
  9. Fenrir Fenris

    Fenrir Fenris New Member

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    Firstly i would like to thank you all for your prompt and informative replies ^_^

    Now to answer questions. xD

    Cevo70 - I am currently in school, i can leave when i like however, due to the type of schooling, and no, i am not following any kind of career currently. except this, which I'm still reading up on.

    Jim B - Thanks for the links, they have been, and will continue to be, very informative. I've started writing up the a game design document for my "dream game" =) [i don't expect it to be made at any point, it's more of an exercise in game design documentation then anything else]

    Maupin - Thank you for stressing the "start small, but definitely start" point, it is indeed a good one.

    TimS - Thanks for the compliment, I'm a fan of mythological studies, i read lots about myths and religions, interesting stuff. I'm not hugely interested in "making money". as in, I'm not here to make a bazillion bucks and retire, I'm looking into this to see if i can make a career out of it. I do not know how to code, and although i am MUCH more interested in the idea of actual designing games (rather then the nitty gritty of creating them at a base code level) i would definitely be willing to learn, i don't mind if it's a little tedious, as long as i can see it developing (if i can't see things progressing i sometimes lose interest). As for indie Vs big company, ultimately, i think it would be awesome to create big cutting edge games, but i would also enjoy creating small time more basic games, of course the big one have an attraction, but i would have no problem making a living from an indie game network.
    And hell yes, if your having fun, tell me ;)

    baldong + mooktown - I don't really know anyone who knows about this kinda thing, and I'm pretty socially weak, i don't really like talking to career advisers and teachers and stuff xD I probably should though

    Desktop Gaming - Thanks, i think i knew most of the points everyone said, but sometimes they need to be said, for your mind to put them in order, ya know? I get your advice, it is as sound as everyone else's in the thread, i don't expect anyone to impressed by allot i do for a while xD

    Thanks all =]

    I realised i had written a really bad question ("Can you give me advice"), bleh.
    So i shall try and make a more direct list

    - 1 - Does anyone have the exact location for any free software that would allow me to start programming? Or an advice page on basic coding, anything along these lines to get me starting making basic games right away.
    - 2 - Please tell me the process that you personally use to make money through your games (if you do), in stages. This is so i can get a wide idea of how exactly it is done.
    - 3 - How difficult is it to go from indie gaming to big time company game design?
    - 4 - How hard is it to make a career in indie gaming? in your opinion? this can be as simple as 0/10 or as complex as you like.
    - 5 - I don't expect this last one to work, but if you don't ask, you don't get. I would like someone with a working game that is making them money to create a short line up of how it works for them, so basically, the game itself, any info they want to give on how it was made/what processes they went through and how/with who they make there money. Sort of like a case study. The more detailed the better.


    Any answers to any of the above questions would be just dandy :) If not that's fine, i tries making more concise questions.

    Thanks again.
     
  10. baldong

    baldong New Member

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    - 3 - How difficult is it to go from indie gaming to big time company game design?
    If u perform good in indie gaming business, u will have a good change perform good in the big company game design, pay attention I mean the same game genre. But when u begin to work in company, at first, u may not have enough freedom as your indie time, so u may feel sick after have a taste of so-called big company project. I think first go to a game company then transfer to indie, is more like a shortcut.
     
  11. Fenrir Fenris

    Fenrir Fenris New Member

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    Thanks for the reply ^_^
     
  12. Fenrir Fenris

    Fenrir Fenris New Member

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    Bump? No more comments?
     
  13. Obscure

    Indie Author

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    -1-. www.gamedev.net a site dedicated to game development with lots of useful advise on where to start and active forums where you can ask technical questions. I strongly suggest that you spend time reading before asking questions. There is a lot of information available so the users probably wont be too friendly if you ask basic questions that are already answered in the FAQs and articles.

    Answering questions 2 onwards would be pretty pointless at this stage. There is no point in learning about the business side when you haven't done any development and thus don't know if you will enjoy it. Sure you like the idea of being a developer but that isn't the same things as actually enjoying doing it. Game development is hard, repetitive and in places dull. To succeed and make it a career you need to really enjoy it. Find out if you can actually develop before worrying about making it a career.
     
  14. bbjones

    bbjones New Member

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    I would add that you should find out if you are the right type of person to be a developer.

    There are certain personality types that do well with programming, where it feels right and natural hence the love of doing it. There are other personality types that simply don't fit.

    I've seen both and how in some cases the desire is there, but the natural ability to "think" that way simply doesn't exist. It can make for a significant waste of time and money down the wrong path.

    So I'm mainly suggesting/agreeing with others that you should prove to yourself that the "nitty gritty" day-to-day activities are what's right for you as a person.

    But, you're also 17 and have the world ahead of you to make of it what you will.

    Cheers
     
  15. Fenrir Fenris

    Fenrir Fenris New Member

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    Thanks for the replies guys, i'll be sure to check out that site ^_^
     
  16. fpcorso

    fpcorso New Member

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    I just have a few things to add. I am still in the learning process, I am almost finished with my first commercial game for XBLCG. My approach might not be the best into the world of game making, but I started with Game Maker. Simple program to use, but it taught me how I have to think to get the games to work. From making games using that program, I learned things like design, logic, and the overall feel of making a game. While working with that, I began to learn C++. At that same time, Xbox was starting their Community Games. Learning C# was very simple since I had already began learning C++. Here I have learned the other side of things: programming, finding artists and musicians, as well as other business aspects for selling the game.

    That was my approach, just thought it would be helpful info from someone still in the learning stages.

    EDIT: Forgot to mention, one of the best resources I have used while learning languages and programming is http://www.dreamincode.net/

    If you need more resources, sites, books, etc.. Just let me know
     
    #16 fpcorso, May 29, 2009
    Last edited: May 29, 2009
  17. Fenrir Fenris

    Fenrir Fenris New Member

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    pardon? XD
     
  18. saintxi

    saintxi New Member

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    My personal experience - with a good brain for code & graphics I tried writing games for years but never managed to finish one (or even get much more than 5% through a project!), and yet I found it fairly easy to get a job in the mainstream games industry ( 5% is plenty to demonstrate your skills in a demo/screenshots ;) )

    Now about 10 years later I have finally finished my first indie game - and then only with the help of my brother.

    I can only agree with other posters - work out what parts of game dev you like (if you want to head manistream) and press on to finish a game to 100%, it is an impressive achievement. I would not think about sales at the moment - improving your skills is much more important :)
     

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