Google Play Market

Discussion in 'Indie Business' started by igamedev, May 7, 2012.

  1. igamedev

    igamedev New Member

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    Paid - I've heard piracy is rampant. Do you worry about it? What about adding DRM?

    Free - I've read quite a few articles saying free apps with ads or in game purchases is the way to go on GPM due to the piracy.

    Would love to get some feedback from anyone who currently has an app in the Google Play Market. Cheers. ;)
     
  2. Desktop Gaming

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    From my perspective, Google Play (or whatever it's called this week) is a bit of a cesspit, as well as the OS being a complete pain in the ass to develop for due to the wild variations in hardware and phone-specific tweaks to Android. I took particular exception at one time to the glut of drug-growing games and porn slideshows that were appearing with no apparent age rating. With all of that in mind, Android is not a market I will (probably ever) bother to pursue as I'd much prefer to concentrate my efforts on PC, Mac and iOS for now - platforms that generally 'just work' without any device-specific fannying about.

    Android is the "linux" of the mobile phone market. Too many variations, a bitch to get stuff working, and yet a loyal band of... people... who still seem to think it's the be-all and end-all.
     
  3. Grey Alien

    Indie Author

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    Yeah for paid games I've found it to suck too in terms of piracy, device incompatibilities, poor discoverability of games in the store, low sales etc. iOS much better. But I now people with free games with ads who've done really well on it.
     
  4. James Coote

    James Coote New Member

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    On piracy, here are a couple of articles that discuss the issue with regards to android:

    http://www.marketandroidapps.com/development-2/how-to-protect-your-android-application-from-piracy/
    http://stackoverflow.com/questions/...ion-thievery-specific-to-android-applications

    So yes, you can make life hard for pirates. The problem is once your app has been cracked and put out there, there isn't much you can do about it from a technical perspective

    It then comes down to your marketing strategy. If you're going for free to play with in-app purchases, or advertising, then you don't need to worry.

    If you're targeting a niche audience, then you concentrate on guilting your real fans into paying and forget the rest (which also means you're discoverability strategy is not reliant on the crappy market mechanics, chart ranks etc).

    Another strategy is to have regular expansions to your game that only paying customers can get their hands on. Even if pirates eventually crack each expansion, customers who pay won't have to worry about if they have the latest version and where to get it, and they get the update as soon as it is released, rather than when the pirates catch up

    What all this does mean is that you have to have servers somewhere, spitting out the ads, handling the IAP, authenticating users or hosting content. That's an extra overhead and takes development time away from making the core game. You can outsource all these things, but on other platforms, the platform holder provides many of these tools or services as part of the deal
     
  5. seigiac

    seigiac New Member

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    We've had a game up on Google Play for about two weeks now. There haven't been a lot of sales, the game was cracked in almost the day after it went up. But the lite version is doing better than the one on the App Store. I don't have any conclusions yet, it might be too soon for that.
     
  6. siread

    Original Member

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    My game is around number 40 in the top paid apps and is averaging about £200 a day. So despite the heavy piracy you can still make decent money, but that is peanuts compared to being in the top 40 on iOS. Next time around I will definitely be going f2p with iaps on Android.
     
  7. dunipan

    dunipan New Member

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    Are there any preventative measures that can be put in place either by developers or Google for that matter to avoid such piracy? The iOS market seems to have it more under control so clearly there must be a way.
     
  8. TylerBetable

    TylerBetable New Member

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    I think your best bet, unless you're seriously confident in marketing, is to go freemium. That makes your game a much less attractive target for piracy and can even make you more money over the long term anyways (via ads and in-app purchases)

    As for Android vs. iOS, there's certainly less "AAA mobile" competition on Android than iOS. If you're interested in it, then definitely try for it. People have had success on both platforms
     
  9. lennard

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    In-app purchases have certainly been a success story the last few years but does anybody make real money selling in-game ads?

    Tyler - aside from the best bet part - you aren't pushing Betable overtly here. Can you share success story #'s with your service?
     
  10. Applewood

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    My feelings on the "fun factor" of Android match DG's above - it's a wank place to be.

    However for one reason or another, GLWG is still surfing high in the charts bringing in about $1000 a day, which is more than double we're getting from iOS. And that's been the case for some time.

    And I get daily piracy mails via google alerts too. They a bit depressing but I ignore them - I think a lot of "piracy" on phones is kids copying a crack around, it doesn't mean they're getting heavily downloaded.
     
  11. Jack Norton

    Indie Author

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    Ah so now you're making more on Android than iOS? curious! but overall iOS was still much more than Android, right?
     
  12. Applewood

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    Been the case for some time tbh.

    iOS is still ahead overall, largely thanks to the big feature and the first couple of months after it, which were fantastic for sales. However now both apps are in the "mundane" sales phase, Android is catching up rapidly.

    Our sequel is going to drastically drop these numbers, but I'd otherwise expect Android to have been GLWG's best earner by about winter time and thence forever after.
     
  13. lennard

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    Bumping real content past the Viagra ads.
     
  14. dunipan

    dunipan New Member

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    Applewood - given your success with Android do you recommend launching a game out of the gates for this platform, in addition to iOS? Or is better to stagger the launch dates? Or maybe is it better just to focus on the Android launch first?
     
  15. Applewood

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    I'm not really qualified to say, really. Our Android version came out several months after the iOS one and it didn't seem to do us any harm. However I can't know (yet) if a simultaneous release would've been even better. I would expect it would though tbh, just to max out any buzz, but that's just an opinion.

    We're trying like hell to get the Android version of the sequel out at the same time as iOS this time around, especially as the online multiplayer is cross platform. If we make it, I guess we'll get an answer. :)
     
  16. dunipan

    dunipan New Member

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    Thanks for the insight Applewood. Always appreciated.

    There are obviously pros to a dual release but the ability to focus your efforts on two separate releases may also be valuable now that I think of it. Since Android has carved out its own niche of review sites, marketing opportunities etc. a separate launch could help you concentrate your efforts.

    But I agree though that if you are launching an online multi-player that is cross platform a simultaneous launch is very advantageous. Best of luck with it. I am sure you will do great!
     
  17. Applewood

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    Thanks. :)

    We've hired a PR firm to manage this for us this time. The budget seems worth a punt - if they do a good job and get us featured, the fees are paid on day 1. Bit of a gamble, but I think it'll be a net win.
     
  18. dunipan

    dunipan New Member

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    Seems like a good move. I actually started reaching out to PR firms myself this week. Which one did you decide to go with if you don't mind me asking? Most of them tell a convincing story so I am finding it hard for me to justify which one to go with.
     
  19. Applewood

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    TriplePointPR. They are mobile specialists with a good history of success, but I guess I'll get my own answer shortly...
     

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