Five golden rules (for newbie indies)

Discussion in 'Indie Basics' started by Jack Norton, Jul 28, 2010.

  1. CasualInsider

    CasualInsider New Member

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    Get married. Live in Washington state. Get divorced. Washington is a 50/50 state, so what if you don't have any cash assets? Time to sell stuff to make up for it. All of your cash is gone from the divorce, plus you had to sell tons of your assets off so your ex gets 50% of its worth. You have no liquidity, have debt from the divorce, and have lost all motivation to finish your game. I think it's relevant! Don't get married. Make games! Live happy! :)

    I threw don't get married in my list. Sorry about derailing the thread further, but I think it was the people who replied to just that one thing on my list who really brought the thread off topic a bit off topic. Hopefully my original post can be useful to someone starting out.
     
  2. Jack Norton

    Indie Author

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    So Casualinsider got married and now his ex-wife owns 50% of faerie solitaire money? :D
    Sorry, but from the way you describe is clear that you had to deal with it personally!
     
  3. Applewood

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    How the fucking hell did such a thought-provoking thread end up being a place to rant about nasty divorces?!?

    buh-bye...
     
  4. CasualInsider

    CasualInsider New Member

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    No, never been married and never will. But I do know many people in Washington alone who have been divorced and I can learn from their experiences. The situation I described has happened (though game development hasn't been the only passion lost).

    Applewood: I gave an example of my statement's relevance "don't get married" to newbie game developers. I wasn't complaining. Blame the people who nitpicked that single thing and then decided to add nothing of value to the topic.

    Here's my original post http://forums.indiegamer.com/showpost.php?p=229068&postcount=17

    I won't help to derail the thread further. If a mod wants to delete all of the off topics posts go for it, but I think what I said is still valuable.
     
  5. Wrote A Game or Two

    Wrote A Game or Two New Member

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    You can. They're called kids.

    Takes about 12 years to get them "trained" properly enought to be helpful though... ;)
     
  6. Nutter2000

    Original Member Indie Author

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    Does that actually work then?
    Hmm... time to start training my 5 1/2 month son then ;)
    To be fair he's already got the hammering the keys on the laptop down ok :D
     
  7. Nexic

    Indie Author

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    I know plenty of people making more than a decent programmers wage from PC games. Sounds like you've had one attempt and given up, when really you need to be prepared to have 5 or more attempts before you 'make it'. Think of it as a 3 year unpaid intern-ship. :)
     
    #47 Nexic, Aug 2, 2010
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2010
  8. Jack Norton

    Indie Author

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    Or maybe he tried in the "wrong categories": pretty much any offline action/arcade/shoot'em/platformer. Is enough to make those kind of games onlines (MMO or just 1 time fee) to already see an exponential increase of sales, or you can do RPG/simulation/strategy which are a safe bet.

    I know many people selling more than "a handful a month" PC games as well.
     
  9. Nexic

    Indie Author

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    If you're a successful indie your main asset is YOU, and since they abolished slavery not even your wife can claim to own you. Even if she gets 50% of your company in a divorce (which you should be able to avoid anyway), you can just leave and start a new one. Unless you somehow gave her all your mad developing skills she isn't going to be able to keep things going without you.
     
  10. Nexic

    Indie Author

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    Sometimes (especially in my case) it takes 5 or more attempts before you get it through your thick skull which categories suck. :D
     
  11. princec

    Indie Author

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    <stares at toes, sidles away>

    Indeed. Ahem.

    Rule #6: Always do the opposite of what princec says ;)

    Cas :)
     
  12. JGOware

    Indie Author

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    On this forum, you really have to take posted "success" stories with a grain of salt. We have developers posting "finally sold 100 copies in 1 month", "finally made 1000.00 in one month", etc, etc, to each of them that is truely a milestone, to others it was shocking to hear they havn't been doing that all along. I'm sure there are dozens who feel they are doing things right and moving in the right direction, that doesn't mean they're getting rich anytime soon.

    "Portals developers don't count" - Well, hired ones I would agree with. But those with their own ip who get their games on a portal, surely that is still being indie.

    7) They are no rules when it comes to being indie. Shake it up a little. Being indie allows you to change your game plan anytime you want to. Stay current or ahead of emerging market trends. Learn as much as possible, never rest on your abilities. Code in an environment that allows you to be multi platform ready.
     
  13. Applewood

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    Actually, I've never tried it at all tbh. I'm basing my opinions on all the info I've picked up around here over the years.

    I should perhaps qualify that I'm talking about my whole company though, so we'd need to take in at least £15K a month for several months to break even. We've done that on all other platforms but I still can't see us doing that on PC unless we're really lucky.

    "Finally making $1000 a month" is fine if you're a kid living with the folks, or have a rich spouse or whatever, but I need double that just to pay my mortgage. When I talk about indie I mean indie as in "I can support myself with a normal lifestyle, no dependence on anyone else and with no excuses"

    Our TBS will be released on PC if we can get it on Steam, and that will be our first. If we make a mint, I'll necro this thread and eat humble pie. Here's hoping! :)
     
    #53 Applewood, Aug 2, 2010
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2010
  14. Indinera

    Moderator Indie Author

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    The thing is, I personally wouldn't feel comfortable disclosing this kind of information, and I assume others may want to keep it private as well.

    Indeed.
     
  15. Applewood

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    Yes and no imo. If you also get on a portal then fine. But, if all you're doing is writing for them then you might as well be employed (without the upside I might add) - you're totally dependent on one source for your income and if they say "no" then you're in the shit. Doesn't sound very independent to me!
     
  16. papillon

    Indie Author

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    Yeah, but what's a normal lifestyle? :)

    Making $1000 a month is a problem in the US or the UK, but could be good money in other places. (And even in the US/UK a lot of people's rent/mortgages are much smaller than yours.)

    Making $1000 a month in the West if you ARE supported (living with family who help pay rent) is still worth being proud of, as it is probably enough to convince people that your hobby isn't a total waste of time, it means you don't suck at it, and with effort you could probably continue to increase that. That's not a success story yet but it's an on-the-way-up.
     
  17. Indinera

    Moderator Indie Author

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    In some countries $1000 is worth many months of a "normal" life.
    The glory of selling on the Internet.
     
  18. Nexic

    Indie Author

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    Ah sorry, thought you were selling Mega Defender as a solo indie project.

    15k/month on the PC isn't that hard, especially if you've got a decent size team. Plenty of people manage more than that solo.
     
  19. Indinera

    Moderator Indie Author

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    This forum really had double standards on what can be considered being successful lol
     
  20. Applewood

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    Paying for a home, supporting a family, putting kids through school, an annual vacation, saving for the future, decent car, pension, healthcare.

    It's hardly rocket science.
     

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