C4 Engine Indie License Now Available for $100

Discussion in 'Feedback Requests' started by Eric Lengyel, May 19, 2005.

  1. Eric Lengyel

    Original Member Greenlit

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    Terathon Software is now licensing the C4 Engine to developers at the indie-friendly price of $100 per seat. The C4 Engine provides state-of-the-art per-pixel lighting, stencil and soft shadows, an advanced material system, and an integrated user interface system. It also includes a complete sound system, input management, multiplayer networking, and much more.

    Source code is included, and licensees receive code updates for life! A free demo can be downloaded from the C4 Engine website:

    http://www.terathon.com/c4engine/
     
  2. svero

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    There's been a lot of discussion about how much harder the game biz is today than it was a few years back. More competitive etc... I'll tell you one way that isn't true.

    Small game comanies do not lack for quality game creation tools to use at reasonable prices. With engines like this new one, torque, torque2d, the popcap framework, PTK, blitzmax blitz3d and more, developers have a much easier time with the tech side today than they would have a few years back. On the other hand perhaps the fact that game development is more accessible in part contributes to how much competition there is.
     
  3. Sharpfish

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    You are probably right. However it takes a different mindset to fully finish and polish a game even given easier tools than it does just to pick them up full of excitment and create "whatever".

    While I am currently looking around for a solution that suits my needs, other than staying with my low level-ish custom C++ / DX framework and building on it I remember some reasons why I haven't touched stuff like other peoples engines and "Basics" since Amos on the Amiga (which I did finish AND sell games for using).. it was the feeling of "Loosing control", more than that, almost as if it was too easy.. lol. You can start thinking "this app makes it so easy to make a game that probably everyone will be doing it" and it takes some of the burning desire away for me. I am not stupid though, I understand the game is the only thing that counts (which is why I am now looking around), but in the past when I thought about NOT having to do low level stuff, or spend 6 months really learning and creating everything "by hand" I felt like I was cheating, or rather, worried that as these things got easier "just anyone" would be doing it.. a bit like what happened to Music with the easy creation packages... devaluing the effort.

    This was just a feeling. I realise though, that is a seperate issue to "running a small scale games business" and that the only thing that counts there is getting games released and not staring at a hundred lines of capschecking code and wondering how robust it is ;)

    Anyway - C4 Engine.. another one for me to check out.. thanks for the heads up!
     
  4. sparkyboy

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    I fully concur Steve (Dos was a nightmare :D ).Its never been easier to get into game programming,but as we all know,the bar is considerably higher than it was years ago.

    Now if only I could get this 3D stuff to stick in my pea brain. :p :D



    All the best

    Mark
     
  5. svero

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    Dos.. oh my. I still remember coding to each particular svga card, and having to understand things like latch registers, and having to code to various sound boards etc... Heh. Man... Course it's starting to feel a bit that way again with these 3d cards each interpreting directx in their own "special" way.
     
  6. electronicStar

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    Nice engine, but it needs optimization some of the rooms are really fluid while other rooms are running at 1 fps. The portal room is killing my computer (athlon XP3200+ 64 bits/ geForce7500).
    The per pixel lightning is nice, I like how you can tilt the hanging torches to modify the lighting.
    There should be more information about the creation process and what languages can be used in interface with the engine (only C++ ?)
     
  7. Eric Lengyel

    Original Member Greenlit

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    Hi --

    The portal room was made pretty heavy graphics-wise on purpose so that it would show what could be done on higher-end graphics cards. Each of those torches is casting shadows, so we knew that it would kill lower-end GPUs. I'm assuming you meant that you have an GeForce FX5700 -- not a bad card, but not great either. On my GeForce Go5700 (which ought to be slower than yours), I get 8.5 frames per second in that room with everything onscreen.
     
  8. Sybixsus

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    I agree that it would be nice to see what languages it can interface with.

    Am I right in thinking that this engine is not compatible with non-shader hardware? ( The site seems to suggest this, but perhaps this is only at this stage of development. ) If so, this would probably be a deal-breaker for a lot of indie developers.
     
  9. tentons

    Indie Author

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    The engine looks great, but I'm not sure it's targeted at the right market. How many indie games need (or desire) pixel shaders? Not that every indie game is or should be a simplistic color matching game with DX3 support, but the sheer scope of content for big 3d games is generally out of reach for a lot of indies.

    I could be totally wrong, and I wish you the best, as it looks like a really nice engine.
     
  10. electronicStar

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    My graphic card is a FX5700LE which isn't the fastest out there, and -since my computer is brand new- it might not be properly optimized and drivererd, BUT you must assume some (a lot) of final users will run on crappy hardware and backward compatibility is an absolute requirement, especially for an indie engine, just lok at the unreal engine that can run on most silly old machines.
    In the portal room I get approx 1.5 frame per seconds (I can count them myself lol).
    Anyway I don't know 3d hardware coding very much but I'm surprised at the big slowdown (even 8 fps is slow), that's why I was talking about optimization, I was thinking about level optimization (zoning and stuff like that).The portal room is complex but not that much, I think game designers could reach this kind of complexity fairly soon.

    Concerning the shader problem : as I said backward compatibilty is very important, there should be fallbacks for unsupported operations. It might not be the most fun to code, but that's what makes a valid game engine.

    Nevertheless I do think there's a market for indie games with a killer 3d engine.
     

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