Boot Camp?

Discussion in 'Indie Business' started by Gilzu, Apr 6, 2006.

  1. Gilzu

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  2. Pacmanwitz

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    Well, I'm a Mac user and I wouldn't pay for a game that doesn't run on Mac OS.
    Having to reboot all the time just to play games would be horrible, and I hate using Windows, it's so inferior.
     
  3. Sillysoft

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    For people who were interested in running Windows on their intel Mac it's really nice that Apple has done this. However, the vast majority of mac users are not in this category. So there will always be a market for mac native games.
     
  4. Anthony Flack

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    What this does is, it makes Windows users much more likely to make their next computer a Mac. And why not? I would.

    I guess this will increase Apple's market share somewhat (well, it should, it's a tempting proposition). Since Mac OS 10 is nicer to use than Windows for day-to-day stuff, I could see those users prefering Mac OS to Windows wherever possible. I don't see it as being a case of "hey, people with macs can play our Windows games", rather more "hey, Windows users might be more interested in Mac software".
     
  5. Ricardo C

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    Wow, a breathing, talking cliché!

    Correcto. I started budgeting for one as soon as I read the article.
     
  6. Red Marble Games

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    I think the impact of BootCamp will vary depending on the type of game. Players of hardcore AAA games -- the Quakes and Dooms etc. -- are (I'll bet) hardcore in other ways too, and a much higher percentage of them will dual boot. Whether that's true or not, I think AAA publishers and developers may perceive it that way, and the interest in ensuring a native Mac version may drop even lower. Whereas more casual players are less likely either to want to shell out the $ for two OSes, or to fool around with learning two of them, and so I should think that casual/indie gamers would remain more interested in native Mac versions.

    This may be just wishful thinking on my part, since my business is porting Windows games to the Mac; and companies like Aspyr and Feral that have focused on bringing AAA Windows titles to the Mac may try to keep that alive. But I've already had one online retailer tell me that they're adjusting their focus to emphasize casual titles in light of the BootCamp announcement.

    Will be interesting to see.
     
  7. Musenik

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    Mark is right. The casual gamer wants a quick distraction. Rebooting is not conducive to a fun distraction.



     
  8. kay.altos

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    I think we defenitely should make both MAC and Win version if we want to earn more money. And this way we will protect our selves if our customers move from Win to Mac or from MAC to Win.
     
  9. scotths

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    If it can run 3DS Max with any sort of speed and reliability I know what my next computer will be. I love my iBook like oxygen itself, and I love Blender, but I feel left out not having access to this standard tool.

    Scott
     
  10. ThomasW

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    A Mac Mini with boot camp would be a great development machine now. It's cheap, a lot easier to move around than a big PC, and would make cross platform development for PC/Mac a lot easier because you'd have a Mac there to test on.
     
  11. GBGames

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    I'd think that native applications would be preferred. It sounds to me like the same issue with games being ported to Gnu/Linux. Native clients are preferred to "Hey, it runs ok in Cedega!" and a number of people don't like the idea of having to pay for the privilege of getting their already-paid-for games to run.
     
  12. Ricardo C

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    I run Linux 90% of the time :) I develop on Blitzmax, and boot into Windows for testing only.

    Bootcamp is a partitioner/boot manager, not an emulator. Windows runs natively.
     
  13. GBGames

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    Oh, I understand the difference, but the point is that if you have a Mac, you're not going to want to buy games that require a reboot if you can buy the native version. And if you have a choice between two games, and one that has a native version, you'll prefer to purchase that one.

    For example, if I have a choice between Half-Life 2 and Doom 3, and assuming that I didn't have my issues with Steam/Valve/customer-disservice, I'll get Doom 3 because it can run natively on my Gnu/Linux system.

    Similarly, who will want to run a Windows version of a game if they can get the Mac version instead?
     
  14. Ricardo C

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    Oh I get what you mean now :)
     

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