Bigfishgames Commission - 65%

Discussion in 'Indie Business' started by dypaul, Jan 25, 2005.

  1. dypaul

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    Hello all,

    I found out that Bigfishgames charges 65% to list your game on their site, and they claim that this rate is fixed for all developers (including, if you take their word literally, Gamehouse and Popcap, which seems farfetched). I wonder what other big portals charge as well (such as Yahoo and RealOne). Given this exorbitant fee, maybe we indie developers can come up with strategies to bypass these big portals -- at least initially. What do you think?
     
  2. Jack Norton

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    Welcome to the portals world ;)

    Reflexive takes 60% (5% less, still better than 65%).
     
  3. Dan MacDonald

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    Garage Games only charges a 35% charge to publish your game. As far as I know that's the best in the business.
     
  4. Ricardo C

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    "But 35% of something is better than 100% of nothing. Surely you see the benefit in this!"

    Just getting the standard portal justification out of the way. Carry on.
     
    #4 Ricardo C, Jan 25, 2005
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2005
  5. Andy

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    Woo-hoo! Dan! Please stop me when I'll be out of the rage :)

    60% of Gross Jack. Plus amount of so-so (stupid) additional requirements. Plus their rating in Alexa is equal to our own and they promote their own competitive products at their site and act as Bill Gates at the sites like GameTunnel (what is the differense guys?) ;)

    What I'm meaning really? - Big Fishes are the best you've met so far dypaul. Paul! Are you reading this? - I hope so!.. ;)
     
  6. BongPig

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    Reflexive do not take 60%. I think you've got it backward.
    Lets not bash reflexive armed with mis-information.
     
  7. Jack Norton

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  8. BongPig

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    oops. Sorry.
    My bad. :)
    I was thinking of something else completely!

    ( I need to give up these various substances. :confused: )
     
  9. Dan MacDonald

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    You know, I personally like talking about portals in terms of "Commission" as opposed to royalties.

    It seems we are often told about the great "25% royalties!" or "30% royalties!!!"

    I like putting the "65% Commission! :eek: " spin on it. It reminds you not to get too excited :)
     
  10. Evak

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    the developer only gets about 20% - 30% most of the time for non exclusive deals. Garage games are 50/50 for non exclusive deals which is pretty good, but they are very picky in regards to which games they will publish.

    And these days they are looking for cross platform Mac and PC games almost exclusively.
     
  11. KNau

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    If you are dealing with a portal that can put your game in front of hundreds of thousands of people daily, then I think it's worth it. The problem is that I know of a few lower end publishers that also take the same commission rate. The brand name portals set the bar and the wannabes follow along.

    Garage Games has a fraction of the traffic of the major portals but with the Mac audience I'm willing to bet the conversion rate is better. But like they say, you gotta be cross platform.
     
    #11 KNau, Jan 26, 2005
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2005
  12. ErikH2000

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    Take a look at what Home of the Underdogs is offering. If your game is chosen as a "top dog" by a team of volunteers, then you can sell from the HOTU store. They handle payment processing, will host downloads, basically the whole order process, and that is for a 10% transaction fee. That is the only thing you pay them.

    Home of the Underdogs has been around for a long time and collected many users. I don't think they are really oriented so much around selling games, but more towards being an interesting place for gamers to come. You should also read the Scratchware Manifesto to get an idea of the philosophy behind the place.

    -Erik
     
  13. papillon

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    and in the past year and a half, how many games have they added to their store? Oh, that's right. NONE.

    It sounded like a good idea, but HOTU apparently decided not to go through with it.
     
  14. ErikH2000

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    I'm not sure how many games were added to the store in the last year and a half, but I see 8 games listed there now. HOTU doesn't seem to be terribly good at getting games listed in their store, but they are good at getting users onto their site. I wouldn't worry about being one of the early gamesellers there. It doesn't look like they ask for any rebranding work, so for a measely 10%, and a real site that attracts gamers, it seems worth a shot to me.

    -Erik
     
  15. papillon

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    I'm just saying, they haven't added any games since the month after the store was launched, and have generally ignored any requests to get into the store, speaking from personal experience and anecdote. They pretty much dropped the idea.

    It *seems* like it would be a nice place to sell games but someone would have to convince them to actually bother doing it again. :)
     
  16. Diodor Bitan

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    I earn $6.8 for each affiliate sale of my $20 games (I use Regnow: 20% for their fee, 40% for the affiliate bonus, 6% for the extra affiliation fee). That amounts to exactly a 66% commission :D

    And I love when people affilliate my game too :)
     
  17. Mark Fassett

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    Sounds like you need to use Plimus - you could get 16% more out of the deal...
     
  18. Diodor Bitan

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    Considering the Regnow affiliation cookie detection script, I would be able to do that without causing my affiliates to lose sales, so now I only have my outrageous laziness to blame for sticking with Regnow. :eek:
     
  19. svero

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    Well look.. Bigfish is making a profit selling games. Maybe a pretty good profit. But they have a lot of expenses and they're the ones putting the money and risk in. They have a full-time staff, they have significant advertising expenses, they have transaction, bandwidth, and mailing expenses. They pool those expenses and charge a fee to list with them and collect the difference. And a fair price is what you're willing to pay and they can offer which is good enough for them to get games. They seem to be offering enough to get a game a day. The market dictates the commission. If another portal comes around that has their traffic and offers 50% people will have a choice. Right now there aren't many choices and commissions are similar.
     
  20. James C. Smith

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    For what it’s worth, if you want to use Reflexive’s payment processing service and DRM the fee is less than 10% of gross plus COGs. In other words, Reflexive keeps part of the sale to cover the cost of goods (credit card processing fee of about 4%), and charges a fee of less than 10% on the rest of the money. That comes out to around $2 or $3 dollars per $20 sale being help back and $17 or $18 paid to the developer. This is not for putting your game in Reflexive’s distribution network and on our web site. This is for doing the equivalent of what Softwrap and Trymedia do. Or like what Plimus and RegNow do plus Reflexive gives you a DRM system to use similar to Armadillo.

    If you want Reflexive to distribute your game that is another storry. In that case 20% goes to Reflexive, 40% of the money goes to the web site (Reflexive.com or one of it’s affiliates) and 40% goes to the developer.

    My point is that comparing the fees or commissions Plimus and Big Fish Games is like comparing Apples and Orangutans. One is a payment processor and the other is a retailer with a big audience. They are completely different services.
     

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