Any "non-casual" games sell good?

Discussion in 'Indie Basics' started by sticksfirmly, Oct 11, 2006.

  1. Escapee

    Original Member

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    I think they just inserted the " no spyware and ad ware " recently ..

    time to scan with ad aware, spybot & hijackthis to check if this is infact contains no spyware and the like.


    Title: Air Assault 3D 1.0
    URL of the download publisher: http://www.justfreegames.com/action_airassault_download.html
    URL of the download: http://www.justfreegames.com/downloads/games/airassault/wu/AirAssault3D.exe
    Filename: AirAssault3D.exe
    File size: 11624006
    Full checksum (MD5): c4e956e5da22fa1e89fb1b727dbd2278
    SiteAdvisor Program ID: 643683
    SiteAdvisor last tested this download: 2006 June
    SiteAdvisor last verified this link: 2006 September
     
  2. sgm

    sgm
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    Nonsense. I've never heard of the heroes game, and Might & Magic 9 was pretty horrible. It's the ones that are fun with a big marketing budget you need to worry about. :)
     
  3. Sparks

    Original Member

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    I dont buy that "aging gamer with family" myth.
    As if the big companies wouldn't try to get these as customers, too.
    WarCraft 3 is a perfect example.Its less complex than Your avergae RTS, requires less time yet allows for complex tactics.
    Age of Empires was a big hit recently, over 2 millions copies sold.
    Here in germany things like Settlers 2 Remake sells like sliced bread, games that deal with complex economic dependencies lie Anno are big hits, and most gamers who like those are not your average teenagers.
    I guess that exactly these people look for a common game when they purchase, and less on the internet, they go to stores or to amazon, but rather to stores.
    The mainstream games are becoming more and more accessible these days.
     
  4. sillytuna

    Indie Author

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    Sorry Sparks, got to disagree. There are many, many of us who really don't want to spend so much time in Warcraft or playing strategy games. It isn't a like-dislike thing, they're just far too time engulfing.

    That isn't to say that older gamers aren't playing them. As you point out, older gamers may be the majority.

    I know many, many people who think the same thing, and you know what? I've introduced them to casual games.

    Edit: Also, big companies often don't know how to go for these people and many don't think of them. Remember that marketing generally rules in the retail world - licensing and marketing depts have control. These people are not very flexible.

    The Sims was going to be canned remember, EA didn't get who would buy it. As it turned out, it basically kept them going during the PS1/PS2 transition when little else generated significant enough revenue (they dropped the ball by leaving PS1 too early).
     
  5. Natalie

    Original Member

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    Try RIP and RIP: Strike Back. They are sold relatively well.
     
  6. Bad Sector

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    One question: with the exception of EA, which other game company is "big" ? I can't think any other company that can be considered as "big", at least compared with other computing companies such as Microsoft, IBM, Intel, etc.

    I think that the game industry isn't as big as most people think...
     
  7. sillytuna

    Indie Author

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    Regarding RIP etc - can someone define "sold well" in this respect?
     

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