Any "non-casual" games sell good?

Discussion in 'Indie Basics' started by sticksfirmly, Oct 11, 2006.

  1. sticksfirmly

    sticksfirmly New Member

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    Hey all,

    I've been trolling and the indie scene for a while and just had a quick question that I know that I can't answer.

    So, it seems that the majority of games that do pretty well are more casual (as in match-3 clones) or more geared towards family (with cute graphics and whatnot).

    I was wondering if anyone could tell me if there are any indie games that AREN'T casual out there that sell well.

    I know about Kudos, Democracy, and all if Cliff's work, so I kind of want to exclude them. In addition, I'm looking for games that are more serious and (possibly) violent.

    For example, "Alien Shooter" had great reviews and that's the kind of game I'm talking about. Does anyone know if that game sold well?

    If you can think of non-casual indie games that sold well that are NOT puzzle, match-3, or anything like that, could you direct me to them?

    (Also, if this is in the wrong section, please move accordingly)
     
  2. luggage

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    Crimsonland? Don't know how well it sold but it was talked about a fair bit.
     
  3. KNau

    Original Member

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    I've heard that both Alien Shooter and the Air Strike series have done very well. Also that Smallrockets.com crumbled under management issues, not lack of sales and their Red Ace games were very popular.

    Also, while you may argue that Puppy Games isn't selling huge numbers he has carved out a good niche that I suspect will continue to grow. Plus, he doesn't have to worry about being cloned to death.
     
    #3 KNau, Oct 11, 2006
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2006
  4. bignobody

    Indie Author

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    I don't think he's ever released numbers, but I hear Dan Marshall's Gibbage did better than he expected. Lots of violence and cartoon blood 'n gibbie goodness.
     
  5. Coyote

    Indie Author

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    Because SOMEBODY is gonna be saying it sooner or later: Cliffski's games are non-casual.

    A couple of games over at GarageGames do pretty well. Or did. Not sure how they are selling now.

    And Manifesto Games is all about selling to the non-casual audience.
     
  6. Popcorn Boy

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    It'd be interested to hear how games like Popcap's Heavy Weapon and Master of Defense sell online.
     
  7. sticksfirmly

    sticksfirmly New Member

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    I know they aren't. I just think they're more "casually" than most other non-casual games.

    Aside from that, it didn't seem that Gibbage is actually doing all that well to me. In addition, it seems that Dan didn't have ANY expectations when he made the game at all. Dan, any comments???

    Never heard of Crimsonland actually. I guess I got into the game too late....

    I didn't know that Smallrockets is done. I DID hear a lot about Red Sky and I did imagine that they were having decent sales.

    Also, Tribal Troubles does NOT seem to be doing that well to me either? Is the maker on the phorums?
     
  8. sticksfirmly

    sticksfirmly New Member

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    Holy s**t!

    Popcorn, I didn't know that you made Darwinia! That game isn't THAT casual, and, even though it's in stores, would you care to offer your insight?
     
  9. jwc

    jwc New Member

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    There's difference between "non casual" and "bloody games".
    Kudos can be liked from women because has no violence on it - Alien Shooter is completely different.
    I don't think you have a chance to earn same money with a "bloody" game that will appeal mostly only to male audience.

    The usual path for a male gamer is:
    Code:
    play demo->wow cool->open browser in google an type "gamename crack/serialz"->play pirate version
     
  10. Sillysoft

    Indie Author

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    My game Lux Delux is not casual (in the typical "casual games" sense) and it sells very well. I think with non-casual games there isn't the same kind of portal aggregation going on, so it's harder to see the top games - a lot of them are selling direct or get their audiences from the more mainstream gaming sites.
     
  11. LilGames

    LilGames New Member

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    Great question SticksFirmly.
    It's going to be a tough one to answer though, because it mesically requires that the author or publisher reveal sales info. (And "successful" to one author might not be so for another).

    I'd be curious to know how "Mutant Storm" has done.
     
  12. Skinflint

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    "Selling well" is soooo relative.

    Crimsonland is a violent shooter that DID and DOES sell well, based on what it cost to make. "What it cost to make" is the key. Tero over at 10Tons did most of the work, and Reflexive helped test and design some of the game, as well as provide some art and sound assets. If Reflexive had made the game in-house, I don't think it would have been profitable. Our costs of development are too high. However, since 10Tons did the bulk of the actual development, it worked out well for everyone.

    Wik, that we made for the Casual audience, but isn't a casual game, didn't "do well" until we released it on XBLA.

    (and no, I'm not releasing any numbers to support this...) :)
     
  13. Nexic

    Indie Author

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    There are loads of non-match3, non-cute games selling well, you just haven't found out about it because they don't make their money on the portals. Of course this doesn't mean you can make any game you like and get great sales.
     
  14. stiill

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    I'd be shocked if Defcon didn't do reasonably well. Also, I've never seen sales figures on Uplink, but Introversion seemed to suggest it funded them for a while.
     
  15. Popcorn Boy

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    Well, we didn't make Darwinia - Introversion did, but we did publish it for retail. Darwinia is definitely not a casual game, and not something you normally see on traditional portals (nor do we have the rights to shop it to them). In fact, I think it has probably been most successful on Steam. I can't speak to the online numbers, but I can say that we did get good distribution of the title at retail including Wal-Mart and Best Buy. We'll have to wait and see how the final numbers shake out.

    We have an affiliated label called Cinemaware Marquee through which we publish traditional/core games like Darwinia and Space Rangers 2 (RPGs, RTS's, etc), while we typically publish our more casual games under the eGames label. There will be some crossover when we release Defender of the Crown which is a Cinemaware property but will offer more casual gameplay...
     
  16. DanMarshall

    Original Member

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    Ummm.... how'd you work that out given that I've never told anyone how many copies I've sold?
     
  17. tewe76

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    I've no sales info, really, but it seems that Jets & Guns did very well and it's absolutely non-casual.
     
  18. Anthony Flack

    Indie Author

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    You are two sides of the same person. Like in Fight Club. Sorry, but it's better that you know.
     
  19. DanMarshall

    Original Member

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    I like the way some people think I'm "Marshall" who comes on IndieGamer occasionally and slags people off. Like that's a brilliantly cunning pseudonym for me to have picked in order to act all nefarious on the boards...
     
  20. Marshall

    Marshall New Member

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    I don't debate that Platypus sold a lot of units. It was everywhere, and it's an awesome, awesome game. The comical part is how much you failed to make anything out of it, except for the generosity of Retro64, and how much you are now delaying the release of your next project for fear that your newfound mad game design skillz, that define your self-worth, may be proven wrong by bad sales or bad reception of the game due to a market mismatch (ie. "confronting with reality"). It's so much easier to post 10 times a day giving design advice to everyone while never testing it out in the real world.

    Marshall.
     

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