a new OS... too much?

Discussion in 'Indie Related Chat' started by EmadY, Jun 12, 2012.

  1. EmadY

    EmadY New Member

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    okay, I know introductions are in the roll call, but I think this one can pass, as it's important to the subject I want to say.

    First off, hey, I'm Emad, Lebanese, and currently at 16-years of age.
    I plan on going to Harvard in two years time, my SAT are pretty good (2100 first time through, doing another one soon) and so I'm hoping i'm in.

    my major will be something on the lines of CCE or CS etc... I've been programming since I was about 12.

    but enough about me, let's go back to mE (you'll get what that means in a sec)

    Now the heart of the matter, what I've ALWAYS wanted to do, was to design my own OS. I already have the name in mind mE-OS (aha, not you get it :D) and I already have some ideas as to what 'new' things I can bring to the 'operating system'

    i was thinking, I'll finish Harvard, get an investment, get a team, and work on it. From my point of view, I'd LOVE that to work, but I want to know the 'real-deal'

    First off, do you think a new OS is too much?
    Second, do you think it can be done, or will I not even stand a chance against Microsoft and the rest?

    also, as for how this is related to Indies, well... Indies are independent producers, and if I know anything is that I'll be 'the man' and will only work for 'the man' if I'm him. game or program or OS, I'll always be independent, and for now, let the Gaming begin...

    (I still want to know your opinions btw)
     
  2. electronicStar

    Original Member

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    IMO everybody is waiting for a new OS to replace windows, but, it will have to be open sourced and free and not belonging to anybody in order to succeed
     
  3. bantamcitygames

    Administrator Original Member Indie Author Greenlit

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    Who is your target market? What will your OS provide to your target market that is not already in Windows, Mac or some flavor of Linux? Would this functionality be enough to get people to switch? If it does become widespread (a huge if), how do you monetize it (or is that not a goal of yours)? Until you can answer those questions its not a path I would personally go down.
     
  4. Olofson

    Original Member

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    Well, first of all, history suggests that it takes somewhere around ten years for a brand new OS to mature to a seriously useful point. There doesn't seem to be a way around that, regardless of resources or development approach.

    Next problem, unless you're basically reimplementing the interfaces of an existing OS, what are you going to run on it...? M$ have already proven over and over that technical perfection is mostly irrelevant. It's all about getting your OS onto the right platforms, and having lots of useful software running on it.

    Now, what I personally would like to see is a move AWAY from these <various inappropriate words elided> operating systems, towards a cross platform API that works across Windows, Linux, OS X, iOS, Android, BSD etc. There is just so much time and money wasted on porting software, even when designing it to be cross platform from the ground up - and even the idea of compiling different binaries for umpteen platforms using THE SAME CPU ARCHITECTURE just seems daft, especially when you're already using the exact same APIs for everything important.

    I'm basically thinking Google NaCl technology, but as part of the host desktop environment, rather than locked into a specific web browser. CPU architectures are no longer an issue; it's easy enough to cross-compile for x86, x86_64 and ARM, or whatever. Environments and APIs is where the real trouble starts these days.
     
  5. lennard

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    Olofson - it's the web. The web is the new OS, end of story. I recognize that there will continue to be native apps for a long time - but not long enough for this guy to build his OS to the point where it is any kind of alternative.

    Emady, you were born 20-30 years too late.
     
  6. Olofson

    Original Member

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    Yeah, I know... It's just that most "web technologies" still suck to the extent that I don't want to touch them at this point. To me, it's like... being on the Amiga and going back from assembly language to AmigaBASIC, if you catch my drift. :D Feature crippled, unreliable and orders of magnitude slower than native applications. Why!? There are no real technical reasons for this these days. Just use a proper JIT VM (slight performance penalty compared to native code) or native code (needs one binary for each supported architecture), and wire it all to some sensible APIs.

    Java has already been doing this for ages - but someone always wants to prevent it from truly working the way it was intended, apparently. Right now, it seems like Oracle is trying to kill it by officially pushing a broken beta as the official version... *sigh*

    NaCl covers the second approach, but is apparently not as much fun as it would seem at this point, but I'm keeping an eye on that one...

    Basically, I think the tech we want is being ruined by companies f*cking each other and all of us over in order to turn a profit where none is really meant to be made. Can we have a REAL standard, with REAL, OPEN implementations one of these decades, to end all this nonsensical waste of resources? Thanks.
     
  7. lennard

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    David, I'm betting these Web issues are resolved long, long, long before this guy builds an OS that is better than the options we have now let alone before it gets widespread adoption. While the odds are incredibly slim that OS comes to pass and gets adopted in meaningful #'s I think an ETA of a decade from starting now would be optimistic. BTW, that OS, for my money would look like an XP that was totally transparent about what was really running under the hood, ultra light on resources, which boots ultra fast and weighs in around $19.99 per seat.
     
  8. Olofson

    Original Member

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    Yeah, I'm not arguing for yet another new OS, but rather against it. The only sensible goal is to eliminate the need to code directly towards umpteen slightly different API sets that, all in all, do the same thing on the same hardware. In fact, creating another OS - however technically superior it may be - would only make the situation even worse, if anything. Yet another platform to support - because the others aren't going anywhere an long as virtually everyone's developing software for specific platforms...

    If instead some evolution of NaCl or whatever reaches a seriously usable state and is widely adopted, people can use whatever OS they like, that runs on their hardware - and there's an opportunity for new operating systems that are more pure implementations of this platform, without all the usual "not invented here" driven cruft. (They'd probably just be stripped down Linux distros anyway, but that's irrelevant to developers and users alike in this scenario.)

    And, the only reason it'll take a decade to get there (and I believe it will) is politics. The tech is already here, and has been for years.

    (Also, grumpy old embedded systems programmer is grumpy. Sorry if my attitude is harsher than usual today... :D)
     
  9. Applewood

    Moderator Original Member Indie Author

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    I'm sure you don't mean "operating system" anyway.

    The first thing you need to get working is thread scheduling and virtual memory. Then it's a unified system to allow hardware to be plugged in and managed.

    If you can do a world-class version of any of those throughout your degree period, your future is already set.
     
  10. Richard Nunes

    Richard Nunes New Member

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    It's too big a project right now. In ten or fifteen years it might be a reachable goal. I was a fan of BeOS for a time but they couldn't get enough traction, couldn't find the right industry to work with and ended up swallowed by Palm, then Plam was swallowed up by HP, then HP ditched all of those years of work and entire product lines to refocus. Even when you have the technical know-how, it's an uphill battle. Don't tackle it when you're sixteen unless there is a very specific market, plenty of money and plenty of patience from your financiers.

    Linux is on absolutely every hardware device already with significant community support. I'm pretty sure you can get Linux to run on a TI calculator.

    If you don't want to join the Linux mob, join any of a dozen other OS projects. I'm a fan of Haiku, personally. That said, my day job requires Windows. Lennard is right, the web has become the universal interface. What the browser runs on is becoming less important.
     
  11. Olofson

    Original Member

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    Specialis: You're suggesting we might need these to get it up after having been exposed to the current breed of bloated excuses for operating systems...?
     
  12. headkaze

    headkaze New Member

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    Stumbled on this video on YouTube today and thought of this thread. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6MJUGVFAXKg

    Quite intereresting if you really want to have a play at making your own basic OS (even just as a learning exercise).
     

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