2D game engine for space trader/platformer

Discussion in 'Indie Basics' started by Regiranka, Apr 16, 2017.

  1. Regiranka

    Regiranka New Member

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    Hi.

    I have been looking for a game engine for my hobby project, a PC game. Imagine a game a bit like the old freelancer game, but completely 2d. You navigate a huge universe in your spaceship, and you might land on planets, pick up cargo and equipment on different worlds, and so on.

    The space exploration part will be a flat 2d universe with the player ship smack in the middle of the screen. Planets will be represented of fixed screen rooms and as a platformer. I'll also need a couple of different versions of inventory, dialogue trees and a save game abilitiy.

    I have looked at libgdx, but I did not like it much. I don't want to work with unity since it always feels like I'm fighting the IDE. Plus, since I want it to be a pure 2d game, I feel unity is to...3d for me. My game world will be a well lit fixed grid with change of scenes now and then. I don't want to bother with light, cameras, premade ai assets and so on.
    I have considered LÖVE, but I want to be able to hide my source.
    Flat red ball seemed promising, but I never got the plugins to work well with visual studio, and I could not find anything on the error code it gave me.

    I am:
    Civil engineer in usability and design, background in coding Java, working as a tester of C# based e-commerce. I know how to program, but I might be a bit rusty.

    What I want:
    1. A programming heavy engine. I intend to make this game myself. If it says "no to little programming required", it's not what I am looking for.
    2. Some kind of support for Tiled, or something of the kind.
    3. Preferably something where I code in C# or Java, but I'm no stranger to learning something new. The bigger the better. I prefer learning Ruby or Python over MonkeyX or "indiescriptlanguage5".
    4. Something where the projects are easy to set up and get running so I can start right away. I want to program, I don't want to fight the tool.
    5. I have no need for source sharing, Git or so on since I'll be working alone on this project.
    6. The less I have to consider other platforms than just PC, the better.

    I understand I might not get all of these things, but the more the better.

    You have any idea? Or should I crawl back to libgdx?
     
    #1 Regiranka, Apr 16, 2017
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2017
  2. WildG

    WildG New Member

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  3. Regiranka

    Regiranka New Member

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  4. WildG

    WildG New Member

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    I'm the one that made it. :)
    We can team up if you like. Let's talk over some chat somewhere.

    houard.remy@gmail.com (works on FB too)
    Discord: WildG#8861
     
  5. Archduke

    Archduke New Member

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    I'll throw my two cents in for Unreal Engine 4. I'm currently making a game that mixes text adventure and 2d cinematic platformer in it.

    The good:
    1. Platform support. Beyond the specifics of getting sdk's and such, any platform you'll want to ship on is supported out-of-the-box.
    2. Lots of example projects. You can start with a working example game and start building your own game on top of it.
    3. As code heavy as you want. You can do everything in C++, or mix in their visual scripting system when you want to.
    4. You're learning an engine that you can use for anything you want to do in the future.

    The downsides:
    1. You need to spend some time getting used to how things are done. This is true for any framework/engine that you use, though.
    2. It can do a lot more than you need it for. The extra features could be distracting.

    Other notes:
    You would have to learn C++. The good news is, C++ for UE4 is a lot closer to C# than raw C++ is. You'll be using the UE libraries to do everything, which lets you avoid the giant mess of C++ standard libraries and api's.

    I would recommend learning and using Git regardless of what you end up doing. It's first and foremost a version control tool, which lets you roll back your code when something breaks and you can't find it. You can also push to Github, which keeps you from crying if your hard drive dies. It's saved my ass many times on my current project alone, and is very, very low overhead once you learn how to use it.


    If you want an alternative, use Game Maker. Only use a framework if you're going to be doing something extremely simple (Tetris clone), or will be writing an engine and don't want to start from scratch.
     
  6. Regiranka

    Regiranka New Member

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    This is exactly the kind of tips I'm looking for. What kind of IDE do you use when coding?
     
  7. Regiranka

    Regiranka New Member

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    No thanks. You'll be annoyed with me, since I'll only be working on it when I have an hour to spare.
     
  8. WildG

    WildG New Member

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    This is a hobby for me so no pressure. But of course it's your call...
     
  9. Archduke

    Archduke New Member

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    UE4 is very intertwined with Visual Studio, which you've probably used for C#. It's nice in that you don't need to set up any of your environment, you just create the project in UE and it will generate your VS project (And starter files if you chose to start with a game example.)
     

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